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Darwinian evolutionary theory and the social sciences

Gough, Ian; Runciman, Garry; Mace, Ruth; Hodgson, Geoffrey; Rustin, Michael
Fonte: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group Publicador: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /02/2008 Português
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This is an edited transcript of a symposium held by the Academy of Social Sciences and the ESRC and hosted by the University of Bath on 14 March 2007. The question addressed was 'whether the theory of natural selection has anything to offer present-day studies of culture and society'. Four leading scholars contributed from different disciplinary backgrounds. All focused on the Darwinian evolutionary paradigm of variation, replication and selection and agreed on its powerful contribution to understanding cultural and social entities and change. However, their contributions revealed the wide variety of concepts, frameworks and empirical studies which come under the general evolutionary heading. The seminar also illustrated the important contribution that such ideas can make to overcoming disciplinary boundaries in the social sciences

Book review: a transatlantic history of the social sciences: robber barons, the Third Reich and the invention of empirical social research, by Christian Fleck

Sage, Daniel
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 01/04/2012 Português
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A Transatlantic History of the Social Sciences helps us better understand how and in what way the social sciences came to occupy a central place in universities across Europe and North America. Author Christian Fleck shows that the social sciences were born in order to help make sense of a complex and changing world, yet ultimately their very shape was structured by the very world they sought to explain. Daniel Sage finds the book to be essential reading for anyone interested in the origins of social research

Book review: a tale of two cultures: qualitative and quantitative research in the social sciences

Kuecken, Maria
Fonte: The London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: The London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 22/05/2013 Português
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85.59%
In A Tale of Two Cultures, Gary Goertz and James Mahoney argue that qualitative and quantitative methods constitute different cultures, each internally coherent yet marked by contrasting norms, practices, and toolkits. The authors seek to promote toleration, exchange, and learning by aiming to enable scholars to think beyond their own culture and see an alternative scientific worldview. Those instructing research methods will find the book a particularly helpful teaching tool, writes Maria Kuecken, with clear examples and case studies throughout. A Tale of Two Cultures: Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences. Gary Goertz and James Mahoney. Princeton University Press. August 2012.

Book review: Social research after the cultural turn

Peach, Donna
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 20/05/2013 Português
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75.68%
"Social Research After the Cultural Turn." Sasha Roseneil & Stephen Frosh (eds.) Palgrave Macmillan. January 2012. --- Social Research after the Cultural Turn aims to address fundamental questions facing those working in the social and human sciences today: How have the epistemological and political contexts of social research changed? Can we still define a distinct sphere of ‘the social’ to research? What distinguishes social research from cultural studies and the humanities? Donna Peach writes that the breadth of topics and depth of enquiry into epistemological and methodological assumptions makes this book a useful companion for academics in any area of the social sciences.

Book review: Cold War social science: knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature

Brock, Jason
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 10/06/2013 Português
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"Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature." Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (eds.). Palgrave Macmillan. January 2012. --- From World War II to the early 1970s, social science research expanded in dramatic and unprecedented fashion. This volume examines how, why, and with what consequences this rapid expansion depended on the entanglement of the social sciences with the Cold War. The contributions reveal how scholars contributed to long-standing debates about knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature in an era of diplomatic tension and ideological conflict. Students should be introduced to this book in an effort to make them think critically about their own discipline’s relationship with the national and global context, writes Jason Brock.

Book review: Shaky foundations: the politics-patronage-social science nexus in Cold War America

Barker, Kye
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 18/06/2013 Português
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"Shaky Foundations: The Politics-Patronage-Social Science Nexus in Cold War America." Mark Solovey. Rutgers University Press. April 2013. --- Numerous accounts have exposed the deep impact of sponsorship and patrons on the production of scientific knowledge and its applications. Shaky Foundations aims to examine a new patronage system for the social sciences in the USA that emerged in the early Cold War years, showing how social scientists were presented with new opportunities to work out the scientific identity, social implications, and public policy uses of academic social research. An important read exposing how money has functioned in determining the contemporary conditions of knowledge, writes Kye Barker.

Five minutes with Andrew Miller MP: “It’s important that people handle information in an intelligent way, and social science has a huge role in this”

Miller, Andrew; Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 09/12/2011 Português
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In 2011 the Science and Technology Select Committee examined the role of science when emergencies such as the H1N1 influenza pandemic and the volcanic ash disruption occur. Andrew Miller, chair of the Government’s Science and Technology Select Committee, speaks about the role he sees for social scientists in such emergencies.

Five Minutes with Nicholas Lemann: “Incorporating academic research adds value to the social mission of journalism”

Lemann, Nicholas; Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 30/12/2011 Português
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Nicholas Lemann, Dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, is a veteran national affairs journalist whose books and articles often incorporated the findings of social science research. In this interview he talks about the role that academic research has in enriching journalism and public knowledge and the need for knowledge-based journalism.

What do the social sciences have in common with baseball? The story of Moneyball, academic impact, and quantitative methods

Kaufmann, Eric
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 21/12/2011 Português
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85.62%
Moneyball, starring Brad Pitt, premiered recently in Britain and though not apparent from the title, the film helps clarify some of the most pressing debates in political science, especially the hot-topic of the ‘impact’ of social science. Eric Kaufmann discusses how the story of a US baseball coach who utilised the human sciences to create a winning dynasty highlights the real, measurable forms of knowledge that social sciences can produce.

Free Event 12 March: From research to policy: academic impacts on government

Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 21/02/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.63%
From research to policy: academic impacts on government, a free, half day conference hosted by the LSE’s Public Policy Group/Impact of Social Sciences Project will be held on Monday, 12th March at the Institute for Government, London.

How visible are UK universities in social media terms? A comparison of 20 Russell Group universities suggests that many large universities are just getting started

Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 03/02/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.59%
Recent research by Horst Joepen from Searchmetrics derives a ‘social media visibility’ score for 20 Russell Group universities, looking across their presence on Facebook, Twitter, Linked-in, Google+ and other media. The LSE Impact blog team have now charted these scores against the sizes of the universities involved. The results suggest that larger universities are having most difficulty in getting their social media presence off the ground, while LSE, Cambridge and Oxford are well ahead in this field.

From research to policy: academic impacts on government

Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 12/03/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.59%
Incentives for academics to engage with government have been strengthed through the REF process. The LSE Impact of Social Sciences team are today exploring the ways in which academics make impacts with government through both tried and tested methods and new technologies. Why not join us?

Free event: Impacts of climate change research

Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 09/05/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.6%
Impacts of Climate Change Research, a free, half-day conference hosted by the LSE’s Public Policy Group/Impact of Social Sciences project and Imperial College London, will be held on Monday, 21st May, at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Join our free event: Evaluating the impact of climate change research

Blog Admin, Impact of Social Sciences,
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 21/05/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.6%
The LSE Public Policy Group/ Impact of Social Sciences project, with Imperial College London, are today hosting ‘Evaluating the Impact of Climate Change Research’, a free-half day conference at the LSE.

Five minutes with Prabhakar Raghavan: big data and social science at Google

Raghavan, Prabhakar; Mann, Rebecca
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 19/09/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
75.61%
Part of PPG’s Impact of Social Sciences project focuses on how academic research in the social sciences influences decision-makers in business, government and civil society. We will cover a series of salient viewpoints emerging from this interview programme on the blog over the next three months. To launch the series Rebecca Mann talked to Prabhakar Raghavan, who is Vice President of Strategic Technologies at Google, and Consulting Professor of Computer Science at Stanford. He explains the role that social scientists are already playing in the development of the tech sector in Silicon Valley, and discusses the opportunities for impact and some remaining obstacles to collaboration.

Travelling in the social science community: assessing the impact of the Indian Green Revolution across disciplines

Howlett, Peter
Fonte: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /02/2008 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
75.63%
The Indian Green Revolution, which began in the late 1960s, offers an exemplary case for studying the nature of evidence and how it travels between academia and the public sphere, between different academic disciplines and over time. Initial assessments of the Green Revolution’s effects were generally positive; yet by the mid-1970s, a more negative view of its impact had come to prominence. By the 1990s this view was, in turn, being displaced by a more optimistic one. The aim of this paper is not to evaluate the impact of the Indian Green Revolution, but rather to examine how the different constituencies of the social science community have communicated with one another on this topic and to examine what facts about it have travelled over time and between the different social science disciplines. By their very nature different social science disciplines are concerned with different aspects of any given issue: an economist might be interested in the impact on output and income over time, whilst a sociologist might be more concerned with the impact new technology has on existing social relations, and a geographer on the use of land and water. Through an in-depth analysis of 76 articles published between 1969 and 2004 in journals covering the range of social science disciplines...

The roles of evolution in the social sciences: is biology ballistic?

Franks, Bradley
Fonte: Wiley-Blackwell Publicador: Wiley-Blackwell
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /09/2014 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.62%
This paper discusses some widespread but often not fully articulated views concerning the possible roles of biology and evolution in the social sciences. Such views cluster around a set of intuitions that suggest that evolution's role is “ballistic”: it constitutes a starting point for mind that has been, and is, superseded by the role of culture and social construction. An implication is that evolved and the socially constructed aspects of mind are separable and independent, with the latter being the primary driver of mind. I outline four variants of the ballistic view. I then show how current findings and arguments in evolutionary thinking as related to mind contradict those ballistic views. The contrary view—that evolutionary and social factors are interdependent in the generation of social psychological capacities—is proposed as a consequence. This view is able to respect some insights of theories that make ballistic assumptions, whilst avoiding those assumptions.

Book review: Research design: creating robust approaches for the social sciences

Cooke, Barbara J.
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 16/09/2013 Português
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85.61%
"Research Design: Creating Robust Approaches for the Social Sciences." Stephen Gorard. SAGE Publications. February 2013. --- Research design is of critical importance in social research, despite its relative neglect in many methods resources. This book discusses the nature of design, offers a flexible approach to new designs, and looks at a range of standard design models. Stephen Gorard‘s book is illustrated with case studies of real work and concludes with suggested readings and topics for discussion in seminars and workshops, making it an essential read for all social science researchers, concludes Barbara J. Cooke.

Molecular genetics and subjective well-being

Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Koellinger, Philipp D.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrick K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Krueger, Robert F.; Bartels, Meike
Fonte: The National Academy of Sciences of the USA Publicador: The National Academy of Sciences of the USA
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 11/06/2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
75.6%
Subjective well-being (SWB) is a major topic of research across the social sciences. Twin and family studies have found that genetic factors may account for as much as 30-40% of the variance in SWB. Here, we study genetic contributions to SWB in a pooled sample of ≈11,500 unrelated, comprehensively-genotyped Swedish and Dutch individuals. We apply a recently developed method to estimate "common narrow heritability": the fraction of variance in SWB that can be explained by the cumulative additive effects of genetic polymorphisms that are common in the population. Our estimates are 5-10% for single-question survey measures of SWB, and 12-18% after correction for measurement error in the SWB measures. Our results suggest guarded optimism about the prospects of using genetic data in SWB research because, although the common narrow heritability is not large, the polymorphisms that contribute to it could feasibly be discovered with a sufficiently large sample of individuals.

How can we capture the subject's perspective? An evidence-based approach for the social scientist

Lahlou, Saadi
Fonte: Sage Publications Publicador: Sage Publications
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /12/2011 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
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This paper addresses the methodological gap that impedes the collection of empirical data on subjective experience. It describes a new family of methods for social science research (Subjective Evidence-Based Ethnography: SEBE). The methods are based on: first-person audio-visual recording with a miniature video-camera worn at eye-level (‘subcam’); confronting subjects with these first-person recordings to collect their subjective experience; formulating the findings and discussing the final interpretation with the subjects. These procedures enable subjects to reconstruct and describe their psychological state at the moment of action, especially their goals, by reviewing films of their own activity recorded from their own perspective with subcams. These films provide situated records of actual activity in natural environments, without the need of an external observer. This approach, by providing both detailed records of actual activity and evidence-based accounts of the subject’s own mental processes, supports grounded progress in ethnography, psychology, ergonomics, sociology and the social sciences in general. There are also applications for training and cross-cultural contacts. The techniques are described in sufficient detail for the reader to make use of them. Examples of applications are provided and limitations are discussed.