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Presence and duration of anti-Toxoplasma gondii immunoglobulin M in infants with congenital toxoplasmosis

Lago,Eleonor G.; Oliveira,Anna Paula; Bender,Ana Lígia
Fonte: Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria Publicador: Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/08/2014 Português
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55.92%
OBJECTIVES: to investigate the rate of positivity for immunoglobulin M anti-Toxoplasma gondii (Toxo-IgM) in newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis, and the age when these antibodies become negative. METHODS: patients with congenital toxoplasmosis who started monitoring in a congenital infection clinic between 1998 and 2009 were included. Inclusion criteria were routine maternal or neonatal serological screening; diagnostic confirmation by persistence of immunoglobulin G anti-Toxoplasma gondii at age > 12 months, and Toxo-IgM screening in the neonatal period. To calculate the frequency of positive Toxo-IgM, cases detected by neonatal screening were excluded. For the study of the age when Toxo-IgM results became negative, patients with negative Toxo-IgM since birth and those in whom it was not possible to identify the month when the negative result was achieved were excluded. RESULTS: among the 28 patients identified through maternal screening, 23 newborns had positive Toxo-IgM (82.1%, 95% CI: 64.7-93.1%). When adding the 37 patients identified by neonatal screening, Toxo-IgM was positive in the first month of life in 60 patients, and it was possible to identify when the result became negative in 51 of them. In 19.6% of patients...

Endemic pemphigus foliaceus (fogo selvagem) and pemphigus vulgaris: immunoglobulin G heterogeneity detected by indirect immunofluorescence

Aoki,Valéria; Huang,Milian H. T.; Périgo,Alexandre M.; Fukumori,Lígia M. I.; Maruta,Celina W.; Santi,Claudia G.; Oliveira,Zilda N. P.; Rivitti,Evandro
Fonte: Faculdade de Medicina / Universidade de São Paulo - FM/USP Publicador: Faculdade de Medicina / Universidade de São Paulo - FM/USP
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2004 Português
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56.09%
Pemphigus are autoimmune intraepidermal blistering diseases in which immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies are directed against desmosomal glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to determine the IgG subclass profile of endemic pemphigus foliaceus (fogo selvagem) and pemphigus vulgaris utilizing indirect immunofluorescence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 25 with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (fogo selvagem), and 25 healthy controls were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence for circulating autoantibodies (total IgG and its subclasses). RESULTS: Our data revealed a significant correlation (P <.05) of disease activity and autoantibody levels in both forms of pemphigus, i.e., negative titers related to clinical remission, whereas positive results related to active disease. Immunoglobulin G subclass analysis in fogo selvagem demonstrated that in patients in remission, 56% showed positive immunoglobulin G4; in active disease, immunoglobulin G4 was the predominant subclass (100% positive in all cases). The IgG subclass profile in pemphigus vulgaris showed that in patients in remission, only 10% were positive for immunoglobulin G4; in active disease, positivity for immunoglobulin G4 was present in 78% to 88% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Subclass characterization of immunoglobulin G autoantibodies is a useful tool for pemphigus follow-up...

A chromatographic method for the production of a human immunoglobulin G solution for intravenous use

Tanaka,K.; Sawatani,E.; Shigueoka,E.M.; Campos,T.C.X.B.; Nakao,H.C.; Dias,G.A.; Fujita,R.K.; Arashiro,F.
Fonte: Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica Publicador: Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/11/1998 Português
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75.94%
Immunoglobulin G (IgG) of excellent quality for intravenous use was obtained from the cryosupernatant of human plasma by a chromatographic method based on a mixture of ion-exchange, DEAE-Sepharose FF and arginine Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography and a final purification step by Sephacryl S-300 HR gel filtration. The yield of 10 experimental batches produced was 3.5 g IgG per liter of plasma. A solvent/detergent combination of 1% Tri (n-butyl) phosphate and 1% Triton X-100 was used to inactivate lipid-coated viruses. Analysis of the final product (5% liquid IgG) based on the mean for 10 batches showed 94% monomers, 5.5% dimers and 0.5% polymers and aggregates. Anticomplementary activity was 0.3 CH50/mg IgG and prekallikrein activator levels were less than 5 IU/ml. Stability at 37ºC for 30 days in the liquid state was satisfactory. IgG was stored in flasks (2.5 g/flask) at 4 to 8ºC. All the characteristics of the product were consistent with the requirements of the 1997 Pharmacopée Européenne.

High quality human immunoglobulin G purified from Cohn fractions by liquid chromatography

Tanaka,K.; Sawatani,E.; Dias,G.A.; Shigueoka,E.M.; Campos,T.C.X.B.; Nakao,H.C.; Arashiro,F.
Fonte: Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica Publicador: Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2000 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
75.99%
In order to obtain intravenous immunoglobulin G (iv IgG) of high quality from F-I+II+III or F-II+III pastes prepared by the Cohn method, we developed a chromatography process using ion exchange gels, Q-Sepharose FF and CM-Sepharose FF, and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration. Viral inactivation was performed by incubating the preparation with pepsin at pH 4.0 at 35oC for 18 h. The characteristics of 28 batches produced by us were: yield 4.3 ± 0.2 g/l plasma, i.e., a recovery of 39.1 ± 1.8%; IgG subclasses distribution: IgG1 = 58.4%, IgG2 = 34.8%, IgG3 = 4.5% and IgG4 = 2.3%; IgG size distribution was 98.4% monomers, 1.2% dimers and 0.4% polymers and protein aggregates; anticomplement activity was less than 0.5 CH50/mg IgG, and prekallikrein activator activity (PKA) was less than 5 IU/ml. These characteristics satisfied the requirements of the European Pharmacopoea edition, and the regulations of the Brazilian Health Ministry (M.S. Portaria No. 2, 30/10/1998).

Adsorption of human immunoglobulin G to poly ( β-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), poly (L- lactic Acid) (PLLA) and PHB/PLLA blends

Lima,M. V. S.; Duek,E. A. R; Santana,C. C.
Fonte: Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering Publicador: Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/06/2009 Português
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65.9%
Biodegradable polymeric materials can be used as temporary implants and may be able to carry out specific functions for a pre-determined period prior to their degradation in vivo. In order to be used they must present characteristics of biocompatibility. When a material comes into contact with blood, the instantaneous adsorption of protein occurs on its surface. Coverage of the surface by γ-globulins causes the adhesion of platelets and, consequently, provokes the process of blood coagulation. In this context, the objective of the present paper was to quantify the adsorption of human Immunoglobulin G (HIgG) to poly ( β-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and PHB/PLLA blends using the FTIR/ATR technique. The results showed the occurrence of HlgG adsorption for all three systems, PHB having the highest adsorption density, about Γmax =2.57 µg/cm², followed by PHB/PLLA blends (Γmax=0.85 µg/cm²) and PLLA with the lowest values (Γmax=0.25 µg/cm²).

Immunoglobulin G proteolytic activity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

Nakanishi,Fernanda Akemi; Avila-Campos,Mario Julio; Kamiji,Nádia Hizuru; Itano,Eiko Nakagawa
Fonte: Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia Publicador: Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/03/2006 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.06%
Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a protease to human immunoglobulin G that is an important evasion mechanism. In this study, the proteolytic activity of A. actinomycetemcomitans strain ATCC 43718 on human immunoglobulin G associated with culture supernatant concentrations, the growth period and the period of incubation with immunoglobulin G were evaluated by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The protease fraction was detected by Sephadex G 150 chromatography. The results showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans produced a protease to human immunoglobulin G in the culture supernatant, and the highest activity was achieved witen the concentration was 27.5 mug protein/mL, after culturing for 72 hours and incubating with IgG for 24 hours. The molecular mass of the protease active fraction was from 43 to 150 kDa.

Influence of smoking and race on immunoglobulin G subclass concentrations in early-onset periodontitis patients.

Quinn, S M; Zhang, J B; Gunsolley, J C; Schenkein, J G; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /07/1996 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.96%
Recent data indicate that smoking is an important risk factor for the development of periodontitis. Smoking is also known to reduce serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels. Interestingly, patients with the localized form of early-onset periodontitis (LJP) have elevated levels of serum IgG2, and those who smoke are not clinically different from nonsmoking LJ subjects. In contrast, patients with the generalized form of early-onset periodontitis (G-EOP) who smoke have more extensive destruction than their nonsmoking counterparts. Given the effects of smoking on EOP and the association of IgG2 with less severe disease, we hypothesized that smoking might reduce serum IgG2 and that this might be most apparent in G-EOP. We therefore examined the effects of smoking on serum IgG subclass concentrations in race-matched groups: LJP, G-EOP, and age-matched periodontally healthy controls (NPs). Smoking status was established from serum cotinine levels, and serum IgG subclass concentrations were determined by using radial immunodiffusion. The data indicated that the effects of smoking were remarkably selective with respect to both IgG subclass and race. Smoking did not appear to have any effect on the concentration of IgG1 or IgG3 in either black or white subjects. In contrast...

Immunoglobulin G enhances C3 degradation on coagulase-negative staphylococci.

Correa, A G; Baker, C J; Schutze, G E; Edwards, M S
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/1994 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.92%
Antibody and complement are essential to host defense against infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci in the neonate. To evaluate the influence of antibody on C3 deposition, we compared the C3 fragments deposited on coagulase-negative staphylococci after opsonization with normal human serum or with hypogammaglobulinemic serum. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, the degradation products of C3 were less apparent at 1 and 2 min after opsonization with hypo- and agammaglobulinemic serum than those from normal human serum. This finding suggested that antibody contained in normal human serum contributes to efficient C3 deposition in the early phases of opsonization. There was no clear difference in C3 deposition when slime-producing strains were compared with non-slime-producing strains. The addition of intravenous immunoglobulin to hypogammaglobulinemic serum and serum from premature neonates rendered C3 deposition comparable to that seen with normal human serum. The data from these experiments suggest that the addition of immunoglobulin G may improve host defense against coagulase-negative staphylococci in the hypogammaglobulinemic premature neonate by enhancing C3 deposition...

Localization of host immunoglobulin G to the surface of Pneumocystis carinii.

Blumenfeld, W; Mandrell, R E; Jarvis, G A; Griffiss, J M
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/1990 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.92%
In immunoblotting studies of Pneumocystis carinii surface proteins, we found that a secondary antibody, anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG), recognized a 52-kilodalton (kDa) band in homogenates of P. carinii purified from human autopsy lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, even when serum as a source of primary antibody was omitted. The electrophoretic mobility of the 52-kDa band is identical to that of IgG heavy chains. In addition to affinity-purified, anti-human IgG, monoclonal antibodies specific for the Fab and Fc regions of human IgG recognized the 52-kDa band. To determine whether the 52-kDa band represents IgG bound to the surface of P. carinii, we treated intact organisms with Triton X-100 and acid in order to elute immunoglobulin from the surface of P. carinii. After purification over a protein G column, the eluate comigrated with human IgG, was recognized by anti-IgG, and bound to discrete bands with molecular sizes of 65 to 70, 60, 50, and 35 kDa in purified, rat-derived P. carinii. To confirm the presence of human IgG on the surface of P. carinii, we performed immunocytochemical and immunoelectron microscopic studies. Staining of intact P. carinii aggregates by anti-human IgG was pronounced and was abolished by acid treatment. IgA was also present. Ultrastructural studies showed the presence of IgG on the cyst wall and on fine membranous structures and vesicles adjacent to cysts. We conclude that the surface of P. carinii is coated with human IgG. The close association of human IgG with P. carinii may have implications for the pathogenesis of P. carinii pneumonia in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

Comparison of the Vitek Immunodiagnostic Assay System with an indirect immunoassay (Toxostat Test Kit) for detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in clinical specimens.

Sandin, R L; Knapp, C C; Hall, G S; Washington, J A; Rutherford, I
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/1991 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.92%
The value and convenience of testing for specific anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies have led to the development of various antibody detection methods, such as the enzyme immunoassay. Two enzyme immunoassays, the Vitek Immuno-Diagnostic Assay System (VIDAS; Vitek Systems, Hazelwood, Mo.) and the Toxostat Test Kit (TST; Whittaker Bioproducts, Walkersville, Md.), were compared for their ability to detect T. gondii immunoglobulin G antibodies in fresh human sera. Specimens were tested according to the instructions of each manufacturer. Of 304 serum specimens tested, the results for 282 (93%) agreed in both assays (77 were positive and 205 were negative). The results for the remaining 22 (7%) specimens were discrepant; 20 of the 22 specimens tested low positive or equivocal by Toxostat and negative by VIDAS. Upon retesting, 8 of these 22 specimens were in concordance, increasing the level of agreement to 95.3%. Intra-assay reproducibility was tested with four to nine replicates of each of seven samples (four positive, one negative, and two equivocal) by both tests and six replicates of one standard by VIDAS. Coefficients of variation (CVs) for VIDAS were 6, 8, 10, 15, 18, 19, and 23% for the samples and 14% for the standard. For Toxostat the CVs were 2...

Method for Rapid Separation of Immunoglobulin M from Immunoglobulin G Antibodies by Using Reorienting Gradients in Vertical Rotors

Wolf, Hans J.; Frösner, Gert G.; Deinhardt, Friedrich
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /04/1979 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.95%
The parameters for the use of reorienting gradients in vertical rotors for rapid separation of immunoglobulin M from immunoglobulin G on a preparative scale for the rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases are described.

Immune response to lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus: isolation of infectious virus-immunoglobulin G complexes and quantitation of specific antiviral immunoglobulin G response in wild-type and nude mice.

Cafruny, W A; Plagemann, P G
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /09/1982 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.92%
Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) causes a normally benign persistent infection of mice, resulting in a life-long viremia characterized by the presence of circulating infectious immune complexes, impaired clearance of certain enzymes from the blood, and modification of the host immune response to various heterologous antigens. In this study, we isolated infectious immunoglobulin G (IgG)-LDV complexes in the plasma of persistently infected mice by adsorption to and elution from protein A-Sepharose CL-4B. We found that practically all infectious LDV in the plasma of persistently infected mice is complexed to IgG. LDV infectivity in these complexes was partially neutralized, but could be reactivated by treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol. We also quantitated total plasma IgG and anti-LDV IgG in wild-type and nude Swiss and BALB/c mice as a function of the time after infection with LDV by radial immunodiffusion and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Total plasma IgG levels nearly doubled in BALB/c mice during 150 days of infection. IgG levels in uninfected nude mice were only 20% of those in uninfected BALB/c mice, but during infection with LDV increased to approximately those found in uninfected BALB/c mice. Anti-LDV IgG levels were almost as high in nude mice as in normal BALB/c mice. Isoelectric focusing of purified IgG from BALB/c mice showed that LDV infection resulted in the enhanced synthesis of all 16 normal IgG fractions that we could separate by this method...

Reactivity with rabbit immunoglobulin G of cold agglutinins isolated from group C streptococcal antisera.

Colling, R G; Brown, J C
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/1981 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.03%
Cold agglutinin antibodies were isolated from group C streptococcal antisera by thermal elution from rabbit erythrocytes. These antibodies reacted with bovine submaxillary mucin, fetuin, immunoglobulin G, and the Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G in hemolytic inhibition assays. Further, in radioimmunoassay these antibodies reacted with the major glycopeptide fragment of rabbit immunoglobulin G. Affinity-purified group carbohydrate-specific antibodies reacted weakly with glycopeptide. These data suggest that certain populations of antibody in group C streptococcal antisera may participate in tissue reactivity via interaction with cell surface glycoproteins, including immunoglobulin G.

Specific absorption of human serum albumin, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G with selected strains of group A and G streptococci.

Kronvall, G; Simmons, A; Myhre, E B; Jonsson, S
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /07/1979 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.93%
Five gram-positive bacterial strains were selected for absorption studies of human serum samples. Strain AR1 (group A, M-type 1) and G148 (group G), with strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding capacities, and strain AW43 (group A, M-type 60), binding both IgA1 and IgA2, were compared with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I and with Staphylococcus epidermidis L603. Both AR1 and G148 were capable of completely absorbing out serum IgG. In contrast, S. aureus Cowan I left a fraction unabsorbed, as expected from its known lack of IgG3 binding. Strain AW43 absorbed out all serum IgA, using a 10-microliter bacterial pellet for 20 microliter of serum. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced by S. aureus Cowan I absorption. On the basis of the experiments, a bacterial mixture was designed consisting of S. aureus Cowan I and group A streptococcus strains AR1 and AW43, with absorption characteristics suitable for use in discriminating between early IgM and late IgG and IgA immune responses in routine serological work. A new type of bacteria-mammalian protein binding was discovered. Human serum albumin was completely absorbed out by strain G148 and to a lesser extent by strain AR1 and AW43. S. aureus Cowan I and S. epidermidis were negative. The binding capacity of G148 for albumin equalled that of Cowan I for IgG. The binding pattern of albumin to the strains was different from those of IgG...

Opsonization of Cryptococcus neoformans by human immunoglobulin G: role of immunoglobulin G in phagocytosis by macrophages.

Kozel, T R; McGaw, T G
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /07/1979 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.92%
The role of immunoglobulin G (IgG) as an opsonin in phagocytosis of Cryptococcus neoformans by macrophages was investigated. Labeling with 125I showed that IgG isolated from normal human serum bound to non-encapsulated C. neoformans. Furthermore, IgG-opsonized cryptococci were agglutinated by anti-serum to IgG heavy chains, indicating that normal human serum contains antibody that will bind to the yeast surface. The IgG isolated from normal serum accounted for all opsonizing activity found in normal human serum, since differences were not noted between the opsonizing activities of whole serum, heat-inactivated serum and purified IgG when these opsonins were compared at equivalent concentrations of IgG. Phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized cryptococci was inhibited by anti-macrophage IgG, a reagent known to block Fc-mediated attachment and ingestion, and by pepsin digestion of opsonizing IgG. Thus, IgG opsonization is an Fc-dependent process. Opsonizing IgG appears to play its major role during the attachment phase of phagocytosis, since antimacrophage IgG blocked attachment of cryptococci to macrophages but could not block ingestion of IgG-opsonized cryptococci that had been allowed to attach to macrophages. Ingestion of opsonized cryptococci was not blocked by 2-deoxy-D-glucose...

Heterogeneity of nonimmune immunoglobulin Fc reactivity among gram-positive cocci: description of three major types of receptors for human immunoglobulin G.

Myhre, E B; Kronvall, G
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /09/1977 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.04%
Two hundred and thirty strains of various gram-positive cocci were tested for quantitative, nonimmune binding of radiolabeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). The majority of coagulase-positive staphylococci and streptococci belonging to serogroups C and G showed a high uptake of IgG. The binding of immunoglobulin to group A streptococci was considerably less, with a number of strains completely negative. None of the pneumococcal or the group B or D streptococcal strains displayed any binding capacity. Heterogeneity of the IgG reactivity of various reactive strains was studied in an inhibition assay using 10 different animal serum pools. Three different inhibition patterns were seen, each of them revealing a striking degree of homogeneity within single bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus and group A streptococci, respectively, constituted two homogeneous groups which differed markedly from each other and from C and G streptococci. No differences were observed between group C and G streptococci. Based on the profound differences between these homogeneous groups, three major types of Fc receptors could be defined. Type I and II Fc receptors were found on S. aureus and on group A streptococci, respectively. Fc receptor type III represented the immunoglobulin-binding structure of both group C and G streptococci.

Immunoglobulin G to virus-specific early antigens in congenital, primary, and reactivated human cytomegalovirus infections.

Gerna, G; Cereda, P M; Cattaneo, E; Achilli, G; Revello, M G
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/1978 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.93%
Immunoglobulin G antibody to human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific early antigens (EA-Ab) was determined by the immunoperoxidase antibody technique in several cases of congenital, primary, and reactivated CMV infections. Mothers of congenitally infected infants and a group of leukemic children and pregnant women were also studied. In 11 cases of congenital infection, CMV EA-Ab was always associated with CMV excretion whether immunoglobulin M antibody was present or not. Nine mothers of congenitally infected infants had CMV EA-Ab for several months after delivery, but association with CMV elimination was not established when urine and/or saliva were tested for virus isolation. In all nine cases of primary CMV infection, CMV EA-Ab was present, and in five its detection was associated with CMV isolation. In one case, disappearance of EA-Ab occurred when virus excretion ceased. In five cases of reactivated CMV infections, a consistent association between CMV EA-Ab and virus isolation was found. Six of 31 leukemia children had CMV EA-Ab, and virus was isolated from 3 of these. Four of 28 pregnant women showed EA-Ab in their serum, but tests for isolation were not done. These data suggest that CMV EA-Ab is not a marker of a current primary CMV infection...

Increased immunoglobulin G production by short term cultured duodenal biopsy samples from HIV infected patients

Schneider, T; Zippel, T; Schmidt, W; Pauli, G; Wahnschaffe, U; Chakravarti, S; Heise, W; Riecken, E; Zeitz, M; Ullrich, R
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /03/1998 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.99%
Background—Secretory immunity is a major defence mechanism against infections at mucosal surfaces which are common in HIV infected patients. 
Aims—To analyse intestinal immunoglobulin production in HIV infection in comparison with that in saliva and serum. 
Patients and methods—Immunoglobulin G (IgG), A (IgA), and M (IgM) concentrations were determined in supernatants of short term cultured duodenal biopsy samples, serum, and saliva from HIV infected patients (n = 28) and controls (n = 14) by radial immunodiffusion. 
Results—IgG was increased in the supernatants of short term cultured biopsy samples and saliva from HIV infected patients compared with controls (p<0.01), but IgA and IgM levels were normal. In contrast, both IgG and IgA concentrations in serum were higher in HIV infected patients than in controls (p<0.002). No correlation was found between IgA produced by duodenal biopsy specimens and serum IgA. 
Conclusion—Abnormalities in mucosal immunoglobulin production in HIV infection were suprisingly small, indicating that specific secretory immunity rather than quantitative immunoglobulin production may be impaired. However, increased production of IgG could contribute to mucosal inflammation by complement activation. Our findings of normal mucosal IgA production and the lack of correlation between serum and mucosal IgA argues against an intestinal origin for the increased serum IgA levels in HIV infected patients. 



Serum immunoglobulin G concentration in Southern elephant seal, Mirounga leonina (Linnaeus, 1758), from Elephant island (Antarctica): sexual and adrenal steroid hormones effects

Ferreira, Ana Paula da Silva; Martínez, Pablo Elías; Colares, Elton Pinto; Robaldo, Ricardo Berteaux; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Miranda Filho, Kleber Campos; Bianchini, Adalto
Fonte: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande Publicador: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.9%
Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG; indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), as well as sexual and adrenal steroid hormones’ concentrations (radioimmunoassay) were determined in 63 (male and female) Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonine) at different developmental stages (weaned pups, juveniles and adults). In females, IgG values (mean _ S.D.) were higher (P < 0.05) in adults (15.9 _ 6.5 mg ml_1) than in juveniles (7.9 _ 4.0 mg ml_1), but similar to weaned pups (12.0 _ 5.0 mg ml_1). Estrogen concentration was higher (P < 0.05) in adults than in the weaned pups. In females, a significant (P < 0.05) correlation (R = 0.4) between serum IgG level and progesterone concentration was observed. In males, testosterone concentration was higher (P < 0.05) in adults than in the juveniles and weaned pups. Aldosterone and cortisol concentrations were higher (P < 0.05) in weaned pups (1056.0 _ 643.1 pmol l_1 and 272.7 _ 110.0 nmol l_1, respectively) than in the juveniles (638.6 _ 579.7 pmol l_1 and 152.9 _ 97.3 nmol l_1, respectively) and adults (386.5 _ 209.1 pmol l_1 and 145.7 _ 67.3 nmol l_1, respectively). These findings indicate that weaned pups are subjected to a higher natural stressful condition in the field. Despite this, humoral immunity...

An investigation of the impacts of induced parturition, birth weight, birth order, litter size, and sow parity on piglet serum concentrations of immunoglobulin G

Nguyen, K.; Cassar, G.; Friendship, R.; Dewey, C.; Farzan, A.; Kirkwood, R.; Hodgins, D.
Fonte: American Association of Swine Veterinarians Publicador: American Association of Swine Veterinarians
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
75.96%
OBJECTIVE: To determine the impacts of induced parturition, birth weight, birth order, litter size, and sow parity on piglet serum concentrations of immunoglobulin G (IgG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In Experiment 1, sows were either induced to farrow (n = 56) or allowed to farrow naturally (n = 84). Litters of induced sows were placed immediately into a warm crèche until farrowing was complete, then all piglets were weighed and placed with the sow at the same time. Blood samples were collected at 3 days of age from one or two of the smallest pigs, one medium pig, and the largest pig in each litter for measurement of serum IgG. In Experiment 2, the firstborn and last-born piglets in 78 litters were blood sampled at 3 days of age and sera were assayed for total IgG. RESULTS: Experiment 1. Mean serum IgG concentration was higher in piglets from induced litters than in piglets from control sows (P < .001). Serum IgG concentrations increased with increased piglet weight (P < .001). Piglets from larger litters had lower serum IgG (P < .001). Serum IgG concentrations in piglets were not affected by sow parity (Experiment 1) or birth order (Experiment 2). IMPLICATIONS: Supervision of farrowing may allow for improved colostrum intake with benefits to passive immunity. However...