Página 1 dos resultados de 1492 itens digitais encontrados em 0.014 segundos

Disorderly democracy: political turbulence and institutional reform in Papua New Guinea

May, Ron
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper Formato: 201187 bytes; 373 bytes; application/pdf; application/octet-stream
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.63%
Papua New Guinea is one of the few post-colonial states that has managed to maintain an unbroken record of democratic government. Parliamentary elections have been held regularly on schedule (the latest in June 2002), and although no government has lasted a full parliamentary term, every change of government has followed constitutional procedures. All changes of government (most of them by parliamentary votes of no confidence against the prime minister) have been accepted by both defeated members of parliament (MPs) and the general public. The judiciary has maintained its independence. Notwithstanding occasional tensions in relations between successive governments and elements within the Papua New Guinea Defence Force (PNGDF), Papua New Guinea has not experienced a military coup. The Freedom House index ranks Papua New Guinea as ‘free’. Yet despite this, both within Papua New Guinea and outside, commentators tend to portray Papua New Guinea as a country marked by political instability, if not chaos, with a state on the verge of collapse. In 1999, for example, Papua New Guinea’s first prime minister, in the context of debate about electoral reform, referred to the country’s National Parliament (of which he is still a member – and in 2002 again prime minister) as a house full of ‘rejects’...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.2. East Sepik Province: text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Lowes, E; Nen, T; Nirsie, E; Risimeri, J; Woruba, M
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.3. West Sepik Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Lowes, E; Nen, T; Nirsie, E; Risimeri, J; Woruba, M
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.4. Western Province: text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Akus, W; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Ling, G; Lowes, E
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.5. Gulf Province: text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Fereday, N; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Lowes, E; Woruba, M
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.6. Milne Bay Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Betitis, T; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Kurika, L; Lowes, E; Mitchell, D K; Rangai, S S; Sakiasi, M; Sem, G; Suma, B
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.7. Madang Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Levett, M P; Majnep, I S; Mangi, V; Nen, T; Sem, G
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.8. Eastern Highlands Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Lowes, E; Stannard, D
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.9. Enga Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Ballard, C; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Humphreys, G S; Kandasan, D
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.10. Western Highlands Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Lyon, S
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.11. Southern Highlands Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Konabe, B; Levett, M P; Lyon, S; Varvaliu, A
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.12. Chimbu Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Lyon, S
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.13. West New Britain Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Bourke, R M; Hide, R L; Allen, B J; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Levett, M; Lyon, S; Nama, L; Nen, T
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.14. East New Britain Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Hide, R L; Fritsch, D; Geob, T; Grau, R; Heai, S; Hobsbawn, P; Ling, G; Lyon, S; Poienou, M
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.15. Central Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Allen, B J; Nen, T; Bourke, R M; Hide, R L; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Lyon, S
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.16. Northern Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Allen, B J; Nen, T; Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Lyon, S; Sem, G
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Agricultural systems of Papua New Guinea: Working Paper No.17. New Ireland Province: Text summaries, maps, code lists and village identification

Hide, R L; Bourke, R M; Allen, B J; Akus, W; Fritsch, D; Grau, R; Hobsbawn, P; Igua, P; Kameata, R; Lyon, S; Miskaram, N
Fonte: The Australian National University Publicador: The Australian National University
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
96.61%
The major purpose of the Papua New Guinea Agricultural Systems Project is to produce information on small holder (subsistence) agriculture at provincial and national levels (Allen et al 1995). Information was collected by field observation, interviews with villagers and reference to published and unpublished documents. Methods are described by Bourke et al. (1993). This Working Paper contains a written summary of the information on the Agricultural Systems in this Province, maps of the location of agriculture systems, a complete listing of all information in the database in coded form, and lists of villages with National Population Census codes, indexed by agricultural systems. This information is available as a map-linked database (GIS) suitable for use on a personal computer in ESRI and MapInfo formats. An Agricultural System is identified when a set of similar agricultural crops and practices occur within a defined area. Six criteria are used to distinguish one system from another: 1. Fallow type (the vegetation which is cleared from a garden site before cultivation). 2. Fallow period (the length of time a garden site is left unused between cultivations). 3. Cultivation intensity (the number of consecutive crops planted before fallow). 4. The staple...

Tertiary Echinoids from Papua New Guinea

Lindley, Ian
Fonte: Linnean Society of New South Wales Publicador: Linnean Society of New South Wales
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
106.29%
Tertiary echinoid faunas from four different environments are described from three localities in Papua New Guinea (PNG). The fauna from the Middle Miocene Langimar Beds at Aseki village, Morobe Province, is dominated by near-surface, sand dwelling clypeasteroid echinoids Echinodiscus bisperforatus Leske, 1778 and Laganum depressum Lesson in L. Agassiz, 1841. The fauna from the Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene Padowa Beds in the Sagarai valley, Milne Bay Province, is dominated by sand and sandy-mud burrowing spatangoid echinoids Brisaster latifrons (A. Agassiz, 1898) and Brissopsis ?luzonica (Gray, 1851). The rich echinoid fauna from the Lower Pliocene Kairuku Formation on Yule Island, Central Province, includes sea-grass meadow dwelling, and highly turbulent, shallow-water dwelling forms. The fauna includes the clypeasteroid echinoids L. depressum and fibulariid (?)gen. et sp. nov., a temnopleurid echinoid Temnotrema macleayana (Tenison-Woods), a phymosomatoid echinoid stomechinid (?)gen. et sp. nov., and spatangoid echinoids B. latifrons and Ditremaster sp. indet. Five of the eight described echinoid genera from the Tertiary of PNG still live in waters of the Indo-Pacific today.

Some living and fossil echinoderms from the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea, and two new echinoid species

Lindley, Ian
Fonte: Linnean Society of New South Wales Publicador: Linnean Society of New South Wales
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
106.32%
Starfish and sea-urchin records of the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea, are scattered throughout the literature of the past 160 years. This paper lists the region's valid starfish and sea-urchin species records contained in the literature. In addition, records of 17 species of starfish and sea-urchins from material in the Department of Geology, Australian National University and the East New Britain Historical and Cultural Centre collections are included, with descriptions of two new sea-urchin species, the schizasterid Schizaster (Paraster) ovatus sp. nov. and the echinometrid Heliocidaris robertsi sp. nov. Some Tertiary echinoids from the region are described for the first time, namely Stereocidaris cf. squamosa Mortensen 1928 (Lower-Middle Miocene: Manus Island), Stereocidaris sp. (Pliocene: east New Britain), Phyllacanthus sp. (Pliocene: east New Britain) and Echinoneus sp. (Pleistocene-Holocene: Tanga Group, New Ireland).

Echinoids of the Kairuku Formation (Lower Pliocene), Yule Island, Papua New Guinea: Clypeasteroida

Lindley, Ian
Fonte: Linnean Society of New South Wales Publicador: Linnean Society of New South Wales
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
106.29%
The Kairuku Formation (Lower Pliocene), Yule Island, Papua New Guinea, contains a rich and diverse echinoid fauna. Clypeasteroid (sand dollar) echinoids are an important component of this fauna and seven taxa are recognised. A seagrass community included