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Prevalence and severity of dental caries in schoolchildren of Porto, Portugal

MELLO, T.; ANTUNES, J.; WALDMAN, E.; RAMOS, E.; RELVAS, M.; BARROS, H.
Fonte: F D I WORLD DENTAL PRESS LTD Publicador: F D I WORLD DENTAL PRESS LTD
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.58%
Objectives: To measure the prevalence and severity of dental caries in adolescents of the city of Porto, Portugal, and to assess socioeconomic and behavioural covariates of dental caries experience. Methods: A sample of 700 thirteen-year-old schoolchildren was examined. Results from the dental examination were linked to anthropometric information and to data supplied by two structured questionnaires assessing nutritional factors, socio-demographic characteristics and behaviour related to health promotion. Dental caries was measured using the DMFT index, and two dichotomous outcomes, one assessing the prevalence of dental caries (DMFT>0); the other assessing the prevalence of a high level of dental caries (DMFT=4). Results: Consuming soft drinks derived from cola (irrespective of sugared or diet) two or more times per week, attending a public school, being female and having parents with low educational attainment were identified as risk factors both for having dental caries and for having a high level of dental caries. Conclusion: Caries levels were positively associated with frequency of intake of sweetened foods and drinks.; CAPES (Brazilian Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel); Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia (FCT)[SFRH/BD/11114/2002]; Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia (FCT)[POCTI/SAU-ESP/62399/2004]; Fundacao Calouste Gulbenkian

Evaluation of the dental arch asymmetry in natural normal occlusion and Class II malocclusion individuals

Scanavini, Paulo Estevão; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Torres, Fernando César; Vasconcelos, Maria Helena Ferreira; Jóias, Renata Pilli; Scanavini, Marco Antonio
Fonte: Dental Press International Publicador: Dental Press International
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
OBJECTIVE: To verify the presence and degree of asymmetry of dental arches in Brazilian individuals with natural normal occlusion and Class II, Divisions 1 and 2 malocclusions. METHODS: The study evaluated the symmetry of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 180 pairs of dental casts, divided into: Group I = 60 pairs of natural normal occlusion individuals; Group II = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion individuals; and Group III = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 2 malocclusion individuals. A device was used to measure dental midline deviation and the canine tip in the dental arches (in degrees). It was also verified the distance of the upper canines from the palatal suture, intercanine distance, and anteroposterior upper and lower first molar position. RESULTS: Dental arches of individuals from all groups presented asymmetry, regardless of the presence of malocclusion. Group I showed a lower asymmetry degree in relation to Groups II and III. The asymmetry in Groups II and III was similar. CONCLUSION: The dental arches of individuals with natural normal occlusion and with Class II, Division 1 and Division 2 malocclusions showed asymmetry. The asymmetry degree was higher in the mandibular dental arches than in the maxillary dental arches in all 3 evaluated groups.

Evaluation of the dental arch asymmetry in natural normal occlusion and Class II malocclusion individuals

Scanavini,Paulo Estevão; Paranhos,Luiz Renato; Torres,Fernando César; Vasconcelos,Maria Helena Ferreira; Jóias,Renata Pilli; Scanavini,Marco Antonio
Fonte: Dental Press International Publicador: Dental Press International
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/02/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
OBJECTIVE: To verify the presence and degree of asymmetry of dental arches in Brazilian individuals with natural normal occlusion and Class II, Divisions 1 and 2 malocclusions. METHODS: The study evaluated the symmetry of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 180 pairs of dental casts, divided into: Group I = 60 pairs of natural normal occlusion individuals; Group II = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion individuals; and Group III = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 2 malocclusion individuals. A device was used to measure dental midline deviation and the canine tip in the dental arches (in degrees). It was also verified the distance of the upper canines from the palatal suture, intercanine distance, and anteroposterior upper and lower first molar position. RESULTS: Dental arches of individuals from all groups presented asymmetry, regardless of the presence of malocclusion. Group I showed a lower asymmetry degree in relation to Groups II and III. The asymmetry in Groups II and III was similar. CONCLUSION: The dental arches of individuals with natural normal occlusion and with Class II, Division 1 and Division 2 malocclusions showed asymmetry. The asymmetry degree was higher in the mandibular dental arches than in the maxillary dental arches in all 3 evaluated groups.

Trends in dental caries experience of school children in Australia - 1977 to 1993

Davies, M.; Spencer, A.; Slade, G.
Fonte: AUSTRALIAN DENTAL ASSN INC Publicador: AUSTRALIAN DENTAL ASSN INC
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1997 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
Data on the dental health of Australian school children from 1977 to 1985 have previously been reported. Significant features included a secular decline in caries experience as defined by the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth in both the deciduous dentition (dmft index) and permanent dentition (DMFT index), and a change in the distribution of caries experience within the child population in Australia, indicated by increasingly smaller percentages of children accounting for greater proportions of total disease experience. The aim of the present paper was to extend the annual reporting on caries experience in Australia up to and including 1993, and to document the change in the distribution of caries within the child population since 1977. In addition, the data are compared with dental targets for children for the year 2000 in Australia and internationally. Caries data were obtained for the years 1977-1993 for children who were patients at School Dental Services in each State and Territory of Australia. Caries experience was recorded by uncalibrated dentists and dental therapists during routine dental examinations. From 1977-89 data were weighted by State and Territory estimated resident populations. From 1989, the data were stratified according to age...

Opinions of dentists and directors of nursing concerning dental care provision for Adelaide nursing homes

Chalmers, J.; Hodge, C.; Fuss, J.; Spencer, A.; Carter, K.; Mathew, R.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2001 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.61%
Background: The complex oral health problems of nursing home residents have been well documented. However, the influences on residents’ oral health status, including opinions and experiences of dental professionals and nursing home staff, have not yet been adequately investigated. Methods: The baseline questionnaire component of this longitudinal study was mailed to all registered dentists practising in Adelaide and Adelaide nursing home directors of nursing (DONs). Results: 413 dentists and 97 DONs indicated that Adelaide dentists’ interest and training in nursing home dentistry was low. Dental service provision for nursing home residents was very low and dentists preferred to provide treatment at their dental practices. Few dental hygienists were working in nursing homes and dental professionals provided little educational assistance for nursing home staff. Dentists and DONs held several common and many varying perceptions of the problems associated with dental care provision in nursing homes. Both identified a group of nursing home environmental constraints and a lack of portable dental equipment. DONs further identified a group of resident related problems, and dentists a group of dental practicerelated problems. Conclusions: These study results provide important information concerning problems with nursing home dentistry for dental service providers...

Access to dental care by young South Australian adults

Roberts-Thomson, K.; Stewart, J.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2003 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.61%
Background: Despite reported concern over the dental care of young adults little research has been done on their use of dental services in Australia. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of dental utilization of young South Australian adults aged 20-24 years. Methods: A random sample of 2300 young adults was selected from the electoral roll. Partial or complete addresses and possible phone numbers were obtained for 1921 persons. Telephone interviews were conducted for 1261 subjects to obtain information on socio- demographics, health behaviour and dental visiting (response rate 65.6 per cent). Results: One third of young adults (34 per cent) had not made a dental visit in the previous two years and 38 per cent usually visited for a problem rather than a check-up. Making a dental visit in the last two years was significantly associated with a number of socio- demographic variables including age and gender, with holders of private dental insurance and those who have not avoided care because of cost having higher odds of making a visit and males and government concession card holders having lower odds of visiting. Usual reason for visiting a dentist for a problem was significantly associated with no private dental insurance...

Provision of diagnostic and preventive services in general dental practice

Brennan, D.; Spencer, A.
Fonte: F D I World Dental Press Ltd Publicador: F D I World Dental Press Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2003 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.58%
Objective: Diagnosis and prevention are among the most frequently provided services in Australian private general dental practice, and have increased over recent times. The aims of this study were to examine the provision of examinations, radiographs, prophylaxis and topical fluoride, and to assess whether these services varied by patient, visit and oral health characteristics. Basic Research Design: Data were collected by a mailed survey of a random sample of dentists from each State/Territory in Australia in 1998-99 with a response rate of 71%. Main Outcome Measures: Data were collected from a log of service items provided on a typical day. Results: Multivariate analyses of services showed that emergency visits were associated with higher rates [RR = Rate ratio, 95%CI] of radiographs (RR = 1.32, 1.06-1.66) but lower rates of prophylaxis (RR = 0.37, 0.29-0.48) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.20, 0.08-0.47) compared to non-emergency visits. Capital city patients had a higher rate of topical fluoride (RR = 2.06, 1.17-3.64) services than non-capital city patients. Patients with decayed teeth had a lower rate of prophylaxis services (RR = 0.82, 0.68-0.99) than patients with no decay. Compared to the reference of caries, patients with aesthetic problems had lower rates of radiographs (RR = 0. 19...

Canadian dental students’ perceptions of their learning environment and psychological functioning over time

Stewart, D.; de Vries, J.; Dent, M.; Singer, D.; Degen, G.; Wener, P.
Fonte: American Association of Dental Schools Publicador: American Association of Dental Schools
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.57%
A cohort of dental students (N=28) at the University of Manitoba was followed throughout their entire dental education program to explore changes in their perceptions of the learning environment over time. Aspects of the students’psychological functioning, including common psychological symptoms, self-esteem, and coping strategies, were also evaluated to assess changes in these factors over time. A battery of instruments consisting of the Learning Environment Survey (LES), the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ), the Ways of Coping Checklist (WCCL), and the State Self-Esteem Scale (SSES) was administered at the beginning, midpoint, and end of each academic year throughout the four-year dental education program. Results indicated that there was a minor positive recalibration of student perceptions in the areas of course relevance and opportunities for outside interests during the first months of year one. Apart from this, perceptions of dental school as a seldom-to-occasionally positive learning environment were maintained over the entire dental education program. In terms of psychological functioning over time, students reported decreases in their levels of problem-focused coping and self-esteem, increased use of avoidance and wishful thinking as coping strategies...

Oral health of Indigenous adult public dental patients in Australia

Brennan, D.; Roberts-Thomson, K.; Spencer, A.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2007 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.57%
Background: Indigenous Australians have been reported in a range of studies to have worse health than non-Indigenous Australians. Among health care card holders, a financially disadvantaged group eligible for public-funded dental care, oral health may also be worse among Indigenous persons. The aims of this study were to examine the oral health of Indigenous compared to non-Indigenous adult public dental patients in terms of caries experience and periodontal status, controlling for age and gender of patient, type of care and geographic location. Methods: Patients were sampled randomly by state/territory dental services in 2001–2002. Dentists recorded oral health status at the initial visit of a course of care using written instructions. The samples were weighted in proportion to the numbers of public-funded dental patients for each state/territory. Results: Multivariate logistic regression showed that the presence of periodontal pockets of 6+ mm was higher (P < 0.05) among Indigenous compared to non-Indigenous patients (OR=2.24, 1.34–3.76), after controlling for age and gender of patients, type of care and geographic location. Multivariate negative binomial regression analysis (RR: rate ratio) controlling for age and gender of patients...

Association of urgent dental care with subjective oral health indicators and psychosocial impact

Luzzi, L.; Jones, K.; Spencer, A.; Roberts-Thomson, K.
Fonte: F D I World Dental Press Ltd Publicador: F D I World Dental Press Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
Pressures on public dental services require new approaches to managing demand. OBJECTIVE: To identify possible predictors of urgency of clinically assessed emergency dental care using self-reported oral health indicators. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study was a prospective study examining associations between patient reports of oral health indicators and psychosocial impact of oral disorders and a clinical determination of a hierarchy of urgency of emergency dental care. The data set comprised a random sample of 839 eligible adults presenting to nine public dental clinics across South Australia and New South Wales for emergency dental care. All participants held a government health concession card and were aged 18+ years and had a minimum of six natural teeth. Significant associations between self-reported oral health indicators and psychosocial impacts and a normative clinical assessment of urgency of emergency dental care were examined by means of binary logistic regression analysis in order to develop prediction models. Prediction of the urgency of emergency dental care was based on the assessment of two models--Model 1: urgency of care = <48 hours vs. 2+ days, Model 2: urgency of care = 2-7 days vs. 8+ days. RESULTS: Some 35.8%, 34.8% and 29.4% of respondents were classified by the assessing dentist as requiring dental care within 48 hours...

25-year Analysis of a Dental Undergraduate Research Training Program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry

Scott, J.; de Vries, J.; Lacopino, A.
Fonte: Inter Amer Assoc Dental Research Publicador: Inter Amer Assoc Dental Research
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry...

Public dental service utilization among adults in South Australia

Luzzi, L.; Spencer, A.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.63%
Background: Longitudinal patterns of public dental service use may reflect access issues to public dental care services. Therefore, patterns of dental service use among South Australian adult public dental patients over a 3½-year period were examined. Methods: Public dental patients (n = 898) initially receiving a course of emergency dental care (EDC) or general dental care (GDC) at baseline were followed for up to 3½ years. Patient clinical records were accessed electronically to obtain information on dental visits and treatment received at those visits. Results: Some 70.7 per cent of EDC and 51.3 per cent of GDC patients returned for dental treatment post-baseline. EDC patients returned within a significantly shorter time period post-baseline, received significantly more courses of care and were visiting more frequently than GDC patients. A greater proportion of EDC patients received oral surgery, restorative, endodontic and prosthodontic services, but fewer received periodontic services. EDC patients received significantly more oral surgery and fewer preventive services per follow-up year, on average, than GDC patients. Large proportions of EDC (52.4 per cent) and GDC (63.8 per cent) patients who returned sought emergency care post-baseline. Conclusions: Patients appeared to be cycling through emergency dental care because of lack of access to general care services...

The extent and nature of dental fear and phobia in Australia

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.64%
Background: For the general dental practitioner, fearful patients are harder and more stressful to treat and are most likely to attend irregularly. This study presents updated and refined dental fear and phobia prevalence estimates in Australia as well as information on the nature of dental fear and phobia. Methods: A total of 1084 Australian adults (response rate = 71.7%) completed a mailed questionnaire. The survey contained four measures of dental fear and phobia, as well as questions regarding potentially anxiety-eliciting dental stimuli and past aversive dental experiences. Results: The prevalence of high dental fear ranged from 7.8% to 18.8%, and more incapacitating dental phobia from 0.9% to 5.4%, depending upon the scale, cut-point and specific criteria used. Dental phobia was significantly associated with blood-injection-injury (BII) concerns. The cost of dental treatment was endorsed as the most anxiety-eliciting dental situation (64.5%), followed by fear of needles ⁄ injections (46.0%) and painful or uncomfortable procedures (42.9%). Anxiety-eliciting stimuli and the type of aversive dental experiences varied significantly by gender, age, income, education, language spoken at home and dental visiting frequency. Conclusions: High dental fear and dental phobia are common in Australia although prevalence estimates are highly dependent on both the scale and cut-points used.; JM Armfield

Australian population norms for the Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C)

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
Background:  The Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C) is a theoretically derived test developed to allow clinicians and researchers to measure a person’s level of dental fear. Population norms have not previously been made available for the IDAF-4C. The aim of this study was to provide Australian norms for the IDAF-4C using percentile ranks and to examine associations between scores and individual-level characteristics, dental avoidance and fear of pain. Methods:  A stratified random sample of 1511 Australian adults yielded complete questionnaire data for 1063 individuals (70.4%). Percentile ranks were calculated for IDAF-4C full scale scores stratified by age and gender. Results:  IDAF-4C mean scores varied significantly by age, gender, income, and speaking a language other than English at home. Tables to convert raw scores to percentiles showed that full scale scores varied by age and gender. Scores on the IDAF-4C had strong and significant associations with avoidance of the dentist due to fear, average dental visiting frequency and anxiety about pain when going to the dentist. Conclusions:  Population norms allow clinicians or researchers to compare results for an individual or subgroup to the Australian population. It is recommended that a dental fear scale be used to screen all dental patients for dental fear to enable a more tailored and effective dental treatment experience.; JM Armfield

The relationship between dental care and perceived oral health impacts

Crocombe, L.; Brennan, D.; Slade, G.
Fonte: F D I World Dental Press Ltd Publicador: F D I World Dental Press Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
Background: Knowledge of the effect of dental care and dental visiting behavior on oral health impacts is important for effective resource allocation. Objective: To determine the association between dental care, including the reason for dental attendance and time since last dental visit, with perceived oral health impacts among Australian adults. Methods: Data were obtained from the Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004/06. Analysis was limited to 4,170 dentate adults who answered the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questions. Prevalence of frequent impacts was defined as the percentage of people reporting ‘fairly often’ or ‘very often’ to one or more of the OHIP-14 questions. Results: Over half the dentate Australians (63.0%) visited a dentist in the past year. Unadjusted analysis showed a statistically significant association between the prevalence of frequent impacts and receipt of: extractions (prevalence ratio=1.7, 95%CI=1.2- 2.2), scale/clean (0.7, 0.5-0.8), and denture care (1.6 1.1-2.4). After adjustment for the usual reason for dental attendance there was no effect of any of the three treatments or the time since last visit on the prevalence of frequent impacts. Conclusion: The usual reason for dental attendance...

Dental visiting by insurance and oral health impact

Brennan, D.; Anikeeva, O.; Teusner, D.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.58%
Background: The aim of this study was to explore whether oral health has an influence on the association between dental insurance and dental visiting. Methods: A random sample of adults aged 30–61 years living in Australia was drawn from the Australian Electoral Roll. Data were collected by mailed survey in 2009–2010, including age, gender, household income, dental insurance status, dental visiting and oral health impact. Results: Responses were collected from n = 1096 persons (response rate = 39.1%). Dental insurance was positively associated with visiting a dentist in the last 12 months (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.31–1.67), while oral health impact was not associated with recent visiting PR = 1.01; 95% CI: 0.89–1.14). Visiting for the purpose of pain relief was less prevalent among insured participants (PR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.44–0.81), but more prevalent among those with poor oral health (PR = 2.85; 95% CI: 2.15–3.76). It was found that oral health impact did not alter the relationship between dental insurance and visiting. Conclusions: Oral health impacts were not associated with recent dental visits, but were associated with visits for pain relief. Dental insurance was associated with a greater likelihood of recent visits and lower levels of relief of pain visits; D. S. Brennan...

Unmet dental need in community-dwelling adults with mental illness Results from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

Heaton, L.; Mancl, L.; Grembowski, D.; Armfield, J.; Milgrom, P.
Fonte: Amer Dental Assn Publicador: Amer Dental Assn
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.61%
BACKGROUND Mental illness (MI) affects approximately one in five U.S. adults, and it is associated with oral disease and poor dental treatment outcomes. Little is known about dental care utilization or unmet dental need in this population. METHODS The authors examined data regarding presence or absence of dental visits and unmet dental need in community-dwelling adults with MI from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. They tested differences between adults with and without MI by using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS Eighteen percent of adults (N = 19,368) had MI, and of these, 6.8 percent had unmet dental need. Although people with MI were not significantly more likely to have had a dental visit (46.3 percent) than were those without MI (42.2 percent; odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.23), they were significantly more likely to report unmet need (11.0 versus 5.3 percent; OR, 2.00; 95 percent CI, 1.67-2.41). Those with mood or anxiety disorders were most likely to report having an unmet dental need (P < .001 for all values). CONCLUSIONS Although people with MI did not visit the dentist significantly more often than did adults without MI, their higher level of unmet need suggests that current use of dental services is not addressing their needs adequately. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS Dentists should be familiar with MI conditions as patients with MI may have greater unmet dental need.; Lisa J. Heaton...

Management of fear and anxiety in the dental clinic: a review

Armfield, J.; Heaton, L.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.58%
People who are highly anxious about undergoing dental treatment comprise approximately one in seven of the population and require careful and considerate management by dental practitioners. This paper presents a review of a number of non-pharmacological (behavioural and cognitive) techniques that can be used in the dental clinic or surgery in order to assist anxious individuals obtain needed dental care. Practical advice for managing anxious patients is provided and the evidence base for the various approaches is examined and summarized. The importance of firstly identifying dental fear and then understanding its aetiology, nature and associated components is stressed. Anxiety management techniques range from good communication and establishing rapport to the use of systematic desensitization and hypnosis. Some techniques require specialist training but many others could usefully be adopted for all dental patients, regardless of their known level of dental anxiety. It is concluded that successfully managing dentally fearful individuals is achievable for clinicians but requires a greater level of understanding, good communication and a phased treatment approach. There is an acceptable evidence base for several non-pharmacological anxiety management practices to help augment dental practitioners providing care to anxious or fearful children and adults.; JM Armfield...

Individual dental expenditure by Australian adults

Teusner, D.; Brennan, D.; Gnanamanickam, E.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.62%
BACKGROUND While dental service use in Australia has been extensively reported, little is known about associated costs. The aim of this article was to describe the annual individual dental expenditure of Australian adults. METHODS Self-reported service use and expenditure data were sourced from a sample of 3000 adults aged 30 to 61 years who were randomly selected from the electoral roll. Bivariate associations between total individual dental expenditure and out-of-pocket expenditure (fees less insurance rebate) and a range of participant characteristics were explored. RESULTS Response rate for the baseline questionnaire was 39.4% and of these, 53.1% responded at 12-month follow-up. The mean total dental expenditure was $702 and mean out-of-pocket expenditure was $489. Toothache was associated with total dental expenditure; adults experiencing toothache had higher median expenditure ($445) than adults who hardly ever/never had toothache ($308) (p < 0.05). Dental insurance status was not associated with total expenditure, but insured had lower median out-of-pocket expenditure ($146) than uninsured adults ($320) (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Affordability variables typically associated with access to dental care, such as insurance status, were not associated with total expenditure...

Predicting relative need for urgent dental care

Luzzi, L.; Spencer, A.; Jones, K.; Roberts-Thomson, K.
Fonte: F D I World Dental Press Ltd Publicador: F D I World Dental Press Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.59%
OBJECTIVE: To develop prediction models of the relative need for care to differentiate between urgent and not urgent individuals presenting for emergency dental care. DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were collected from 839 adults presenting to public dental clinics across South Australia (SA) and New South Wales (NSW) for emergency dental care. Prediction of the urgency of emergency dental care was based on the assessment of two binary logistic regression models - Model 1: urgency of care=<48 hours vs. 2+ days, Model 2: urgency of care=2-7 days vs. 8+ days. Subsequently predictive equations for urgency of emergency dental care were developed using binary logistic regression analysis. The models incorporated subjective oral health indicators (i.e., experience of pain or other oral symptoms) and measures of psychosocial impact of oral disorders (i.e., difficulty sleeping and being worried about the appearance/health of one's teeth or mouth). RESULTS: The cut-off point for the prediction of urgency was defined as a probability value ≥=0.40 and ≥=0.50 for Model 1 and Model 2 respectively. These cut-off values were chosen as they produced test results that were consistent with the proportions of patients falling into various urgency categories derived from dentist's assessment of urgency. Model 1's sensitivity was 58%...