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Cellular Mechanisms of Interferon Production

Vilček, Jan
Fonte: The Rockefeller University Press Publicador: The Rockefeller University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/07/1970 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.66%
Rabbit kidney cell cultures stimulated with either double-stranded polyinosinate-polycytidylate (poly I:poly C) or with ultraviolet-irradiated Newcastle disease virus (UV-NDV) produce two types of interferon response, designated "early" and "late," respectively. The early response is suppressed by inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis and is therefore thought to represent de novo synthesis of interferon. Circumstantial evidence suggested that this interferon response is regulated by a translation control mechanism. Late interferon production with poly I:poly C only took place in the presence of inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis. The late interferon is therefore likely to be derived by the activation of an interferon precursor. The stimulation of late poly I:poly C-induced interferon production by cycloheximide suggested the existence of a second, posttranslational level of control of interferon production. This posttranslation control seems to be activated by interferon. UV-NDV can probably suppress the synthesis of the posttranslation inhibitory protein, and therefore it stimulates a late interferon response in the absence of inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis. It is postulated that both the translation and posttranslation inhibitor participate in the development of a cellular refractory state to repeated interferon stimulation. The picture of interferon which emerges from this study is one of a heterogenous class of proteins whose production is controlled by cellular repressors acting at various levels.

Interferon and Interferon Inducers in Protozoal Infections

Jahiel, Rene I.
Fonte: The Rockefeller University Press Publicador: The Rockefeller University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/07/1970 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.68%
Several interferon inducers (Newcastle disease virus, statolon, and poly rI:poly rC) as well as exogenous mouse interferon protect mice from sporozoite-induced Plasmodium berghei malaria, as long as they are administered before the end of the preerythrocytic phase of development of the parasite. The protective effect of the interferon inducers was related to their interferon-inducing effect; the protective effect of the interferon preparations was related to the interferon titer of the preparations, and it exhibited other attributes of interferon such as species specificity. In contrast to sporozoite-induced infection, blood forms-induced P. berghei malaria was only weakly susceptible to the protective effect of interferon inducers. This difference may provide an approach to study the mechanism of protection. The growth in cell cultures of another intracellular protozoon, Toxoplasma gondii, is also inhibited by interferon (22). The fact that P. berghei and T. gondii (as well as another group of intracellular parasites susceptible to interferon, the Chlamydia) have their own ribosomes raises questions, concerning the role of host cell ribosomes in the host cell-parasite relationship of these intracellular parasites and in the mechanism of interferon action against them...

Circulating Interferon Production in the Mouse : Origin and nature of cells involved and influence of animal genotype

De Maeyer, Edward; De Maeyer-Guignard, Jaqueline; Jullien, Pierre
Fonte: The Rockefeller University Press Publicador: The Rockefeller University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/07/1970 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.64%
A radiobiological study of circulating interferon production in the mouse was undertaken in the hope of elucidating the site(s) of circulating interferon production. After total body X-irradiation of the animals, different radiosensitivities of circulating interferon production were observed with different viral inducers. Myxovirus-induced circulating interferon production was especially radiosensitive. Moreover, a study of interferon production in syngeneic and xenogeneic radiochimeras demonstrated that cells producing NDV (Newcastle disease virus)-induced circulating interferon were derived from hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, treatment of mice with antilymphocyte serum significantly reduced NDV- and Sendai virus-induced circulating interferon, as opposed to other inducers. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the lymphocyte is the major source of myxovirus-induced circulating interferon. A survey of interferon production in 12 inbred mouse strains, using NDV as inducer, revealed the existence of low and high producers. A Mendelian analysis carried out with low producing Balb/c and high producing C57BL indicated that the difference between low and high interferon producers was caused by a single, autosomal, codominant factor.