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Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) promotes epidermal proliferation, remodeling, and regeneration

Oike, Yuichi; Yasunaga, Kunio; Ito, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Shun-ichiro; Maekawa, Hiromitsu; Morisada, Tohru; Arai, Fumio; Nakagata, Naomi; Takeya, Motohiro; Masuho, Yasuhiko; Suda, Toshio
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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We report here the identification of an angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF). To examine the biological function of AGF in vivo, we created transgenic mice expressing AGF in epidermal keratinocytes (K14-AGF). K14-AGF mice exhibited swollen and reddish ears, nose and eyelids. Histological analyses of K14-AGF mice revealed significantly thickened epidermis and a marked increase in proliferating epidermal cells as well as vascular cells in the skin compared with nontransgenic controls. In addition, we found rapid wound closure in the healing process and an unusual closure of holes punched in the ears of K14-AGF mice. Furthermore, we observed that AGF is expressed in platelets and mast cells, and detected at wounded skin, whereas there was no expression of AGF detected in normal skin tissues, suggesting that AGF derived from these infiltrated cells affects epidermal proliferation and thereby plays a role in the wound healing process. These findings demonstrate that biological functions of AGF in epidermal keratinocytes could lead to novel therapeutic strategies for wound care and epidermal regenerative medicine.

Cathepsin L in secretory vesicles functions as a prohormone-processing enzyme for production of the enkephalin peptide neurotransmitter

Yasothornsrikul, Sukkid; Greenbaum, Doron; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Toneff, Thomas; Bundey, Richard; Miller, Ruthellen; Schilling, Birgit; Petermann, Ivonne; Dehnert, Jessica; Logvinova, Anna; Goldsmith, Paul; Neveu, John M.; Lane, William S.; Gibson, B
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Multistep proteolytic mechanisms are essential for converting proprotein precursors into active peptide neurotransmitters and hormones. Cysteine proteases have been implicated in the processing of proenkephalin and other neuropeptide precursors. Although the papain family of cysteine proteases has been considered the primary proteases of the lysosomal degradation pathway, more recent studies indicate that functions of these enzymes are linked to specific biological processes. However, few protein substrates have been described for members of this family. We show here that secretory vesicle cathepsin L is the responsible cysteine protease of chromaffin granules for converting proenkephalin to the active enkephalin peptide neurotransmitter. The cysteine protease activity was identified as cathepsin L by affinity labeling with an activity-based probe for cysteine proteases followed by mass spectrometry for peptide sequencing. Production of [Met]enkephalin by cathepsin L occurred by proteolytic processing at dibasic and monobasic prohormone-processing sites. Cellular studies showed the colocalization of cathepsin L with [Met]enkephalin in secretory vesicles of neuroendocrine chromaffin cells by immunofluorescent confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Functional localization of cathepsin L to the regulated secretory pathway was demonstrated by its cosecretion with [Met]enkephalin. Finally...

Engineering asymmetric vesicles

Pautot, Sophie; Frisken, Barbara J.; Weitz, D. A.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Vesicles are bilayers of lipid molecules enclosing a fixed volume of aqueous solution. Ubiquitous in cells, they can be produced in vitro to study the physical properties of biological membranes and for use in drug delivery and cosmetics. Biological membranes are, in fact, a fluid mosaic of lipids and other molecules; the richness of their chemical and mechanical properties in vivo is often dictated by an asymmetric distribution of these molecules. Techniques for vesicle preparation have been based on the spontaneous assembly of lipid bilayers, precluding the formation of such asymmetric structures. Partial asymmetry has been achieved only with chemical methods greatly restricting the study of the physical and chemical properties of asymmetric vesicles and their use in potential applications for drug delivery. Here we describe the systematic engineering of unilamellar vesicles assembled with two independently prepared monolayers; this process produces asymmetries as high as 95%. We demonstrate the versatility of our method by investigating the stability of the asymmetry. We also use it to engineer hybrid structures comprised of an inner leaflet of diblock copolymer and an independent lipid outer leaflet.

An experimental platform for studying growth and invasiveness of tumor cells within teratomas derived from human embryonic stem cells

Tzukerman, Maty; Rosenberg, Tzur; Ravel, Yael; Reiter, Irena; Coleman, Raymond; Skorecki, Karl
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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There is currently no available experimental system wherein human cancer cells can be grown in the context of a mixed population of normal differentiated human cells for testing biological aspects of cancer cell growth (e.g., tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis) or response to anti-cancer therapies. When implanted into immunocompromised mice, human embryonic stem cells develop teratomas containing complex structures comprising differentiated cell types representing the major germ line-derived lineages. We sought to determine whether human cancer cells would grow within such teratomas and display properties associated with malignancy, such as invasiveness and recruitment of blood vessels. HEY ovarian cancer cells stably expressing an H2A-GFP fusion protein (HEY-GFP) injected into mature teratomas developed into tumors, which allowed tracking of tumor cell invasion and recruitment of human teratoma-derived blood vessels. This provides a straightforward and powerful approach to studying the biological properties of cancer cells within the microenvironment of normal differentiated human cells.

Disulfide bond formation involves a quinhydrone-type charge–transfer complex

Regeimbal, James; Gleiter, Stefan; Trumpower, Bernard L.; Yu, Chang-An; Diwakar, Mithun; Ballou, David P.; Bardwell, James C. A.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The chemistry of disulfide exchange in biological systems is well studied. However, the detailed mechanism of how oxidizing equivalents are derived to form disulfide bonds in proteins is not clear. In prokaryotic organisms, it is known that DsbB delivers oxidizing equivalents through DsbA to secreted proteins. DsbB becomes reoxidized by reducing quinones that are part of the membrane-bound electron-transfer chains. It is this quinone reductase activity that links disulfide bond formation to the electron transport system. We show here that purified DsbB contains the spectral signal of a quinhydrone, a charge–transfer complex consisting of a hydroquinone and a quinone in a stacked configuration. We conclude that disulfide bond formation involves a stacked hydroquinone–benzoquinone pair that can be trapped on DsbB as a quinhydrone charge–transfer complex. Quinhydrones are known to be redox-active and are commonly used as redox standards, but, to our knowledge, have never before been directly observed in biological systems. We also show kinetically that this quinhydrone-type charge–transfer complex undergoes redox reactions consistent with its being an intermediate in the reaction mechanism of DsbB. We propose a simple model for the action of DsbB where a quinhydrone-like complex plays a crucial role as a reaction intermediate.

Lytic versus stimulatory synapse in cytotoxic T lymphocyte/target cell interaction: Manifestation of a dual activation threshold

Faroudi, Mustapha; Utzny, Clemens; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Guiraud, Martine; Müller, Sabina; Valitutti, Salvatore
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Activation of biological functions in T lymphocytes is determined by the molecular dynamics occurring at the T cell/opposing cell interface. In the present study, a central question of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) biology was studied at the single-cell level: can two distinct activation thresholds for cytotoxicity and cytokine production be explained by intercellular molecular dynamics between CTLs and targets? In this study, we combine morphological approaches with numerical analysis, which allows us to associate specific patterns of calcium mobilization with different biological responses. We show that CTLs selectively activated to cytotoxicity lack a mature immunological synapse while exhibiting a low threshold polarized secretion of lytic granules and spike-like patterns of calcium mobilization. This finding is contrasted by fully activated CTLs, which exhibit a mature immunological synapse and smooth and sustained calcium mobilization. Our results indicate that intercellular molecular dynamics and signaling characteristics allow the definition of two activation thresholds in individual CTLs: one for polarized granule secretion (lytic synapse formation) and the other for cytokine production (stimulatory synapse formation).

Essential role for Atox1 in the copper-mediated intracellular trafficking of the Menkes ATPase

Hamza, Iqbal; Prohaska, Joseph; Gitlin, Jonathan D.
Fonte: The National Academy of Sciences Publicador: The National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The metallochaperone Atox1 directly interacts with the copper-transporting ATPases and plays a critical role in perinatal copper homeostasis. To determine the cell biological mechanisms of Atox1 function, intracellular copper metabolism, and Menkes ATPase abundance, localization and trafficking were examined in immortalized fibroblast cell lines derived from Atox1+/+ and Atox1−/− embryos. Consistent with the proposed role for Atox1 in copper delivery to the secretory pathway, a marked increase in intracellular copper content secondary to impaired copper efflux was observed in Atox1-deficient cells. Although the localization of the Menkes ATPase was identical in Atox1+/+ and Atox1−/− cells under conditions of equivalent intracellular copper content, a significant impairment in copper-mediated Menkes ATPase trafficking was observed in the absence of Atox1. When quantitative confocal immunofluorescence was used, significant differences in the time and dose-dependent trafficking of the Menkes ATPase from the Golgi compartment in response to copper were observed between Atox1+/+ and Atox1−/− cells. These data reveal an essential role for Atox1 in establishing the threshold for copper-dependent movement of the copper-transporting ATPases within the secretory compartment and that...

Beclin 1, an autophagy gene essential for early embryonic development, is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor

Yue, Zhenyu; Jin, Shengkan; Yang, Chingwen; Levine, Arnold J.; Heintz, Nathaniel
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The biochemical properties of beclin 1 suggest a role in two fundamentally important cell biological pathways: autophagy and apoptosis. We show here that beclin 1-/- mutant mice die early in embryogenesis and beclin 1+/- mutant mice suffer from a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. These tumors continue to express wild-type beclin 1 mRNA and protein, establishing that beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Beclin 1-/- embryonic stem cells have a severely altered autophagic response, whereas their apoptotic response to serum withdrawal or UV light is normal. These results demonstrate that beclin 1 is a critical component of mammalian autophagy and establish a role for autophagy in tumor suppression. They both provide a biological explanation for recent evidence implicating beclin 1 in human cancer and suggest that mutations in other genes operating in this pathway may contribute to tumor formation through deregulation of autophagy.

A tenascin-C aptamer identified by tumor cell SELEX: Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment

Daniels, Dion A.; Chen, Hang; Hicke, Brian J.; Swiderek, Kristine M.; Gold, Larry
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The targeting of molecular repertoires to complex systems rather than biochemically pure entities is an accessible approach that can identify proteins of biological interest. We have probed antigens presented by a monolayer of tumor cells for their ability to interact with a pool of aptamers. A glioblastoma-derived cell line, U251, was used as the target for systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment by using a single-stranded DNA library. We isolated specifically interacting oligonucleotides, and biochemical strategies were used to identify the protein target for one of the aptamers. Here we characterize the interaction of the DNA aptamer, GBI-10, with tenascin-C, an extracellular protein found in the tumor matrix. Tenascin-C is believed to be involved in both embryogenesis and oncogenesis pathways. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment appears to be a successful strategy for the a priori identification of targets of biological interest within complex systems.

Ebola virus-like particles protect from lethal Ebola virus infection

Warfield, Kelly L.; Bosio, Catharine M.; Welcher, Brent C.; Deal, Emily M.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Schmaljohn, Alan; Aman, M. Javad; Bavari, Sina
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The filovirus Ebola causes hemorrhagic fever with 70–80% human mortality. High case-fatality rates, as well as known aerosol infectivity, make Ebola virus a potential global health threat and possible biological warfare agent. Development of an effective vaccine for use in natural outbreaks, response to biological attack, and protection of laboratory workers is a higher national priority than ever before. Coexpression of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein (VP40) in mammalian cells results in spontaneous production and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) that resemble the distinctively filamentous infectious virions. VLPs have been tested and found efficacious as vaccines for several viruses, including papillomavirus, HIV, parvovirus, and rotavirus. Herein, we report that Ebola VLPs (eVLPs) were immunogenic in vitro as eVLPs matured and activated mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, assessed by increases in cell-surface markers CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I and II and secretion of IL-6, IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, and tumor necrosis factor α by the dendritic cells. Further, vaccinating mice with eVLPs activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as well as CD19+ B cells. After vaccination with eVLPs...

Anatomy of a chaotic attractor: Subtle model-predicted patterns revealed in population data

King, Aaron A.; Costantino, R. F.; Cushing, J. M.; Henson, Shandelle M.; Desharnais, Robert A.; Dennis, Brian
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Mathematically, chaotic dynamics are not devoid of order but display episodes of near-cyclic temporal patterns. This is illustrated, in interesting ways, in the case of chaotic biological populations. Despite the individual nature of organisms and the noisy nature of biological time series, subtle temporal patterns have been detected. By using data drawn from chaotic insect populations, we show quantitatively that chaos manifests itself as a tapestry of identifiable and predictable patterns woven together by stochasticity. We show too that the mixture of patterns an experimentalist can expect to see depends on the scale of the system under study.

Disruption of TRPM6/TRPM7 complex formation by a mutation in the TRPM6 gene causes hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia

Chubanov, Vladimir; Waldegger, Siegfried; Schnitzler, Michael Mederos y; Vitzthum, Helga; Sassen, Martin C.; Seyberth, Hannsjörg W.; Konrad, Martin; Gudermann, Thomas
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Impaired magnesium reabsorption in patients with TRPM6 gene mutations stresses an important role of TRPM6 (melastatin-related TRP cation channel) in epithelial magnesium transport. While attempting to isolate full-length TRPM6, we found that the human TRPM6 gene encodes multiple mRNA isoforms. Full-length TRPM6 variants failed to form functional channel complexes because they were retained intracellularly on heterologous expression in HEK 293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. However, TRPM6 specifically interacted with its closest homolog, the Mg2+-permeable cation channel TRPM7, resulting in the assembly of functional TRPM6/TRPM7 complexes at the cell surface. The naturally occurring S141L TRPM6 missense mutation abrogated the oligomeric assembly of TRPM6, thus providing a cell biological explanation for the human disease. Together, our data suggest an important contribution of TRPM6/TRPM7 heterooligomerization for the biological role of TRPM6 in epithelial magnesium absorption.

Modulation of the bilayer thickness of exocytic pathway membranes by membrane proteins rather than cholesterol

Mitra, Kakoli; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Warren, Graham; Engelman, Donald M.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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A biological membrane is conceptualized as a system in which membrane proteins are naturally matched to the equilibrium thickness of the lipid bilayer. Cholesterol, in addition to lipid composition, has been suggested to be a major regulator of bilayer thickness in vivo because measurements in vitro have shown that cholesterol can increase the thickness of simple phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers. Using solution x-ray scattering, we have directly measured the average bilayer thickness of exocytic pathway membranes, which contain increasing amounts of cholesterol. The bilayer thickness of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi, and the basolateral and apical plasma membranes, purified from rat hepatocytes, were determined to be 37.5 ± 0.4 Å, 39.5 ± 0.4 Å, 35.6 ± 0.6 Å, and 42.5 ± 0.3 Å, respectively. After cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins, Golgi and apical plasma membranes retained their respective bilayer thicknesses whereas the bilayer thickness of the endoplasmic reticulum and the basolateral plasma membrane decreased by 1.0 Å. Because cholesterol was shown to have a marginal effect on the thickness of these membranes, we measured whether membrane proteins could modulate thickness. Protein-depleted membranes demonstrated changes in thickness of up to 5 Å...

Metagenes and molecular pattern discovery using matrix factorization

Brunet, Jean-Philippe; Tamayo, Pablo; Golub, Todd R.; Mesirov, Jill P.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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We describe here the use of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), an algorithm based on decomposition by parts that can reduce the dimension of expression data from thousands of genes to a handful of metagenes. Coupled with a model selection mechanism, adapted to work for any stochastic clustering algorithm, NMF is an efficient method for identification of distinct molecular patterns and provides a powerful method for class discovery. We demonstrate the ability of NMF to recover meaningful biological information from cancer-related microarray data. NMF appears to have advantages over other methods such as hierarchical clustering or self-organizing maps. We found it less sensitive to a priori selection of genes or initial conditions and able to detect alternative or context-dependent patterns of gene expression in complex biological systems. This ability, similar to semantic polysemy in text, provides a general method for robust molecular pattern discovery.

The yeast cell-cycle network is robustly designed

Li, Fangting; Long, Tao; Lu, Ying; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The interactions between proteins, DNA, and RNA in living cells constitute molecular networks that govern various cellular functions. To investigate the global dynamical properties and stabilities of such networks, we studied the cell-cycle regulatory network of the budding yeast. With the use of a simple dynamical model, it was demonstrated that the cell-cycle network is extremely stable and robust for its function. The biological stationary state, the G1 state, is a global attractor of the dynamics. The biological pathway, the cell-cycle sequence of protein states, is a globally attracting trajectory of the dynamics. These properties are largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. These results suggest that cellular regulatory networks are robustly designed for their functions.

Biomolecular cryocrystallography: Structural changes during flash-cooling

Halle, Bertil
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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To minimize radiation damage, crystal structures of biological macromolecules are usually determined after rapid cooling to cryogenic temperatures, some 150–200 K below the normal physiological range. The biological relevance of such structures relies on the assumption that flash-cooling is sufficiently fast to kinetically trap the macromolecule and associated solvent in a room-temperature equilibrium state. To test this assumption, we use a two-state model to calculate the structural changes expected during rapid cooling of a typical protein crystal. The analysis indicates that many degrees of freedom in a flash-cooled protein crystal are quenched at temperatures near 200 K, where local conformational and association equilibria may be strongly shifted toward low-enthalpy states. Such cryoartifacts should be most important for strongly solvent-coupled processes, such as hydration of nonpolar cavities and surface regions, conformational switching of solvent-exposed side chains, and weak ligand binding. The dynamic quenching that emerges from the model considered here can also rationalize the glass transition associated with the atomic fluctuations in the protein.

Targeted mutations of the juxtamembrane tyrosines in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase selectively affect multiple cell lineages

Kimura, Yuki; Jones, Nina; Klüppel, Michael; Hirashima, Masanori; Tachibana, Kazunobu; Cohn, Jason B.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Pawson, Tony; Bernstein, Alan
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Loss-of-function mutations in the murine dominant white spotting/c-kit locus affect a diverse array of biological processes and cell lineages and cause a range of phenotypes, including severe anemia, defective pigmentation, sterility, mast cell deficits, a lack of interstitial cells of Cajal, spatial learning memory deficits, and defects in peripheral nerve regeneration. Here we show that tyrosine residues 567 and 569 in the juxtamembrane (Jx) domain of the murine Kit receptor tyrosine kinase are crucial for the function of Kit in melanogenesis and mast cell development, but are dispensable for the normal development of erythroid, interstitial cells of Cajal and germ cells. Furthermore, adult mice lacking both tyrosines exhibit splenomegaly, dysregulation of B-cell and megakaryocyte development, and enlarged stomachs. Analysis of signal transduction events induced by the mutant receptors after ligand stimulation indicates that Jx tyrosine mutations diminish receptor autophosphorylation and selectively attenuate activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinases. Together, these observations demonstrate that the Jx domain of Kit plays a cell-type specific regulatory role in vivo and illustrate how engineered mutations in Kit can be used to understand the complex biological and molecular events that result from activating a receptor tyrosine kinase.

RNA interference microarrays: High-throughput loss-of-function genetics in mammalian cells

Silva, Jose M.; Mizuno, Hana; Brady, Amy; Lucito, Robert; Hannon, Gregory J.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which a doubles-tranded RNA directs the silencing of target genes in a sequence-specific manner. Exogenously delivered or endogenously encoded double-stranded RNAs can enter the RNAi pathway and guide the suppression of transgenes and cellular genes. This technique has emerged as a powerful tool for reverse genetic studies aimed toward the elucidation of gene function in numerous biological models. Two approaches, the use of small interfering RNAs and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), have been developed to permit the application of RNAi technology in mammalian cells. Here we describe the use of a shRNA-based live-cell microarray that allows simple, low-cost, high-throughput screening of phenotypes caused by the silencing of specific endogenous genes. This approach is a variation of “reverse transfection” in which mammalian cells are cultured on a microarray slide spotted with different shRNAs in a transfection carrier. Individual cell clusters become transfected with a defined shRNA that directs the inhibition of a particular gene of interest, potentially producing a specific phenotype. We have validated this approach by targeting genes involved in cytokinesis and proteasome-mediated proteolysis.

Functional classification of proteins and protein variants

Lau, Albert Y.; Chasman, Daniel I.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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To help characterize the diversity in biological function of proteins emerging from the analysis of whole genomes, we present an operational definition of biological function that provides an explicit link between the functional classification of proteins and the effects of genetic variation or mutation on protein function. Using phylogenetic information, we establish definite criteria for functional relatedness among proteins and a companion procedure for predicting deleterious alleles or mutations. Applied to the functional classification of sequences similar to 13 human tumor suppressor proteins, our methods predict there are functional properties unique to mammals for three of them, BRCA1, BRCA2, and WT1. We examine protein variants caused by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a set of clinically important genes and estimate the magnitude of a disproportionate propensity for disruption of function among the nonsynomous single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are maintained at low frequency in the human population.

Membrane protease proteomics: Isotope-coded affinity tag MS identification of undescribed MT1–matrix metalloproteinase substrates

Tam, Eric M.; Morrison, Charlotte J.; Wu, Yi I.; Stack, M. Sharon; Overall, Christopher M.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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By proteolytic modification of low abundant signaling proteins and membrane receptors, proteases exert potent posttranslational control over cell behavior at the postsecretion level. Hence, substrate discovery is indispensable for understanding the biological role of proteases in vivo. Indeed, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), long associated with extracellular matrix degradation, are increasingly recognized as important processing enzymes of bioactive molecules. MS is now the primary proteomic technique for detecting, identifying, and quantitating proteins in cells or tissues. Here we used isotopecoded affinity tag labeling and multidimensional liquid chromatography inline with tandem MS to identify MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell proteins shed from the cell surface or the pericellular matrix and extracellular proteins that were degraded or processed after transfection with human membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP). Potential substrates were identified as those having altered protein levels compared with the E240A inactive MT1-MMP mutant or vector transfectants. New substrates were biochemically confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time-of-flight MS and Edman sequencing of cleavage fragments after incubation with recombinant soluble MT1-MMP in vitro. We report many previously uncharacterized substrates of MT1-MMP...