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Resultados filtrados por Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC

Do Reorganization Costs Matter for Efficiency? Evidence from a Bankruptcy Reform in Colombia

Giné, Xavier; Love, Inessa
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.38%
The authors study the effect of reorganization costs on the efficiency of bankruptcy laws. They develop a simple model that predicts that in a regime with high costs, the law fails to achieve the efficient outcome of liquidating unviable businesses and reorganizing viable ones. The authors test the model using the Colombian bankruptcy reform of 1999. Using data from 1,924 firms filing for bankruptcy between 1996 and 2003, they find that the pre-reform reorganization proceeding was so inefficient that it failed to separate economically viable firms from inefficient ones. In contrast, by substantially lowering reorganization costs, the reform improved the selection of viable firms into reorganization. In this sense, the new law increased the efficiency of the bankruptcy system in Colombia.

Evaluating the efficiency of a bankruptcy reform

Gine, Xavier; Love, Inessa
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.4%
The current financial crisis has pushed many firms to the brink of bankruptcy. A key policy question is thus whether bankruptcy laws are efficient, in the sense of allowing better firms to reorganize while liquidating unviable firms. The sixth in impact series presents lessons from a reform in Colombia that achieved this objective.

Innovations in Bankruptcy—Pricing the Priority of Insolvency Claims

Leechor, Chad
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.36%
Following the wave of recent financial turmoil, many developing countries have learned the value of an effective bankruptcy system in deterring excessive use of debt and providing an orderly way to resolve a debt crisis. As a result, they are now reforming their bankruptcy systems, generally modeling them on those of advanced countries. But there is dissatisfaction with bankruptcy frameworks in advanced countries too. Some alternatives have been proposed. One is an options-based approach that provides an objective way of pricing creditor claims according to priority. With allowances for local conditions, this approach offers developing countries a chance to leapfrog existing bankruptcy practices and their limitations. Effective bankruptcy systems have implications for corporate governance and for securities markets. For corporate managers and controlling shareholders, the cost of bankruptcy includes the loss of corporate control and the risk of personal liability. This threat serves as a restraint on the use of debt. In the event of default an efficient and orderly transfer of corporate control to creditors reduces the likelihood of asset stripping and looting by insiders. For creditors...

Modernizing Italy's Bankruptcy Law

Vietti, Michele
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Tipo: Publications & Research :: Brief; Publications & Research
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.44%
Reforming bankruptcy laws is difficult for many reasons. First of all, attitudes in Italy toward bankruptcy make it a difficult subject to generate support for. Secondly, bankruptcy reforms are complex and lengthy. They require changes not only to the bankruptcy law but also to other important parts of the legal framework, such as the codes of civil procedures and, in the case of Italy, the penal code. Finally, they require support from those that must implement them. This paper outlines the author experience in leading the commission for the reform of the bankruptcy law and the lessons learned from it.

Bankruptcy Reform-Breaking the Court Logjam in Colombia

Atiyas, Izak
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Tipo: Publications & Research :: Viewpoint; Publications & Research
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.31%
Many developing countries suffer from logjam in the courts, a condition that tends to reduce the effectiveness of bankruptcy law in relieving financial distress. Colombia's bankruptcy reform provides some useful lessons for these countries. In particular, it shows that when traditional court procedures are hard to change, an alternative is to legally empower another entity to handle the entire process. The author explains how it was done in Colombia.