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STP/HAMPI and Computer Security

Ganesh, Vijay
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 12/04/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
573.93027%
In the past several years I have written two SMT solvers called STP and HAMPI that have found widespread use in computer security research by leading groups in academia, industry and the government. In this brief note I summarize the features of STP/HAMPI that make them particularly suited for computer security research, and a listing of some of the more important projects that use them.

What Should be Hidden and Open in Computer Security: Lessons from Deception, the Art of War, Law, and Economic Theory

Swire, Peter P.
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 24/09/2001 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
583.54625%
"What Should be Hidden and Open in Computer Security: Lessons from Deception, the Art of War, Law, and Economic Theory" Peter P. Swire, George Washington University. Imagine a military base. It is defended against possible attack. Do we expect the base to reveal the location of booby traps and other defenses? No. But for many computer applications,a software developer will need to reveal a great deal about the code to get other system owners to trust the code and know how to operate with it. This article examines these conflicting intuitions and develops a theory about what should be open and hidden in computer security. Part I of the paper shows how substantial openness is typical for major computer security topics, such as firewalls, packaged software, and encryption. Part II shows what factors will lead to openness or hiddenness in computer security. Part III presents an economic analysis of the issue of what should be open in computer security. The owner who does not reveal the booby traps is like a monopolist, while the open-source software supplier is in a competitive market. This economic approach allows us to identify possible market failures in how much openness occurs for computer security. Part IV examines the contrasting approaches of Sun Tzu and Clausewitz to the role of hiddenness and deception in military strategy. The computer security...

Computer Security: Competing Concepts

Nissenbaum, Helen; Friedman, Batya; Felten, Edward
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
585.03895%
This paper focuses on a tension we discovered in the philosophical part of our multidisciplinary project on values in web-browser security. Our project draws on the methods and perspectives of empirical social science, computer science, and philosophy to identify values embodied in existing web-browser security and also to prescribe changes to existing systems (in particular, Mozilla) so that values relevant to web-browser systems are better served than presently they are. The tension, which we had not seen explicitly addressed in any other work on computer security, emerged when we set out to extract from the concept of security the set values that ought to guide the shape of web-browser security. We found it impossible to construct an internally consistent set of values until we realized that two robust -- and in places competing -- conceptions of computer security were influencing our thinking. We needed to pry these apart and make a primary commitment to one. One conception of computer security invokes the ordinary meaning of security. According to it, computer security should protect people -- computer users -- against dangers, harms, and threats. Clearly this ordinary conception of security is already informing much of the work and rhetoric surrounding computer security. But another...