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Detection of minimal disease in hematopoietic malignancies of the B-cell lineage by using third-complementarity-determining region (CDR-III)-specific probes.

Yamada, M; Hudson, S; Tournay, O; Bittenbender, S; Shane, S S; Lange, B; Tsujimoto, Y; Caton, A J; Rovera, G
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /07/1989 Português
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46.26%
Approximately 80% of hematopoietic malignancies of the B-cell lineage carry only one or two immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements indicating their clonal origin. These rearrangements due to the recombination of various variable, diversity, and joining regions of the heavy-chain gene segments during B-cell commitment result in a region called complementarity-determining region III (CDR-III). This region, which encompasses the diversity region of the heavy-chain segment, because of extensive somatic mutations, provides a DNA-encoded signature specific for each B-cell clone. CDR-III sequences were obtained from DNA of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by using suitable primers and the polymerase chain reaction. The sequences were used to generate diagnostic probes that hybridized only to the amplified CDR-III of leukemic cells from which the sequences were derived. With these probes, leukemic cells could be detected when diluted 1:10,000 with other cells. By cloning the amplified CDR-III into recombinant libraries residual leukemic cells were accurately quantitated in bone-marrow samples from repeated relapses and remissions in one case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. During a clinical remission lasting greater than 7 mo...

Expression of TEL-JAK2 in primary human hematopoietic cells drives erythropoietin-independent erythropoiesis and induces myelofibrosis in vivo

Kennedy, J. A.; Barabé, F.; Patterson, B. J.; Bayani, J.; Squire, J. A.; Barber, D. L.; Dick, J. E.
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Activation of JAK2 by chromosomal translocation or point mutation is a recurrent event in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myeloproliferative disorders. Although the effects of activated JAK2 signaling have been examined in cell lines and murine models, the functional consequences of deregulated JAK2 in the context of human hematopoietic cells are currently unknown. Here we report that expression of TEL-JAK2, a constitutively active variant of the JAK2 kinase, in lineage-depleted human umbilical cord blood cells results in erythropoietin-independent erythroid differentiation in vitro and induces the rapid development of myelofibrosis in an in vivo NOD/SCID xenotransplantation assay. These studies provide functional evidence that activated JAK2 signaling in primitive human hematopoietic cells is sufficient to drive key processes implicated in the pathophysiology of polycythemia vera and idiopathic myelofibrosis. Furthermore, they describe an in vivo model of myelofibrosis initiated with primary cells, highlighting the utility of the NOD/SCID xenotransplant system for the development of experimental models of human hematopoietic malignancies.

REDUCED INTENSITY CONDITIONING FOR ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mackinnon, Stephen; Childs, Richard W.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /01/2007 Português
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after myeloablative conditioning is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. In an attempt to extend this therapy to older patients or those with comorbidities, reduced intensity or truly nonmyeloablative regimens have been developed over the last decade. The principle underlying reduced intensity regimens is to provide some tumor kill with lessened regimen-related morbidity and mortality, then rely on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects to eradicate remaining malignant cells, while nonmyeloablative regimens rely primarily on GVT effects. In this article, three representative approaches are described, demonstrating the clinical application for both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. Current challenges include controlling graft-versus-host disease while allowing GVT to occur. In the future, clinical trials using reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative conditioning will be compared to myeloablative conditioning in selected malignancies to extend the application to standard risk patients.

Family history of hematopoietic malignancies and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): a pooled analysis of 10 211 cases and 11 905 controls from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

Wang, Sophia S.; Slager, Susan L.; Brennan, Paul; Holly, Elizabeth A.; De Sanjose, Silvia; Bernstein, Leslie; Boffetta, Paolo; Cerhan, James R.; Maynadie, Marc; Spinelli, John J.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Cocco, Pier Luigi; Mensah, Fiona; Zhang, Yawei; Nieters,
Fonte: American Society of Hematology Publicador: American Society of Hematology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 15/04/2007 Português
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A role for genetic susceptibility in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is supported by the accumulating evidence of common genetic variations altering NHL risk. However, the pattern of NHL heritability remains poorly understood. We conducted a pooled analysis of 10 211 NHL cases and 11 905 controls from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) to evaluate NHL risk among those with hematopoietic malignancies in first-degree relatives. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of NHL and its subtypes were estimated from unconditional logistic regression models with adjustment for confounders. NHL risk was elevated for individuals who reported first-degree relatives with NHL (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.2-1.9), Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1-2.3), and leukemia (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.2-2.7). Risk was highest among individuals who reported a brother with NHL (OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.6-4.8) and was consistent for all NHL subtypes evaluated. If a first-degree relative had Hodgkin lymphoma, NHL risk was highest if the relative was a parent (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.9). If a first-degree relative had leukemia, NHL risk was highest among women who reported a sister with leukemia (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.6-5.6). The pattern of NHL heritability appeared to be uniform across NHL subtypes...

Multipotent hematopoietic cells susceptible to alternative double-strand break repair pathways that promote genome rearrangements

Francis, Richard; Richardson, Christine
Fonte: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Publicador: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/05/2007 Português
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Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of hematopoietic malignancies. The initial molecular events or pathways that lead to translocations in hematopoietic cells are largely unknown, particularly in the stem cell-enriched population postulated to be the initial target for these events. We used in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells combined with an I-SceI endonuclease double-strand break (DSB) repair assay to determine the relative susceptibility of isogenic hematopoietic subpopulations to DSB-induced translocations and the mechanisms that generate them. DSB-induced reciprocal translocations were frequently observed in multipotent progenitors but significantly suppressed in actively proliferating myeloid cells. Most reciprocal translocations in multipotent progenitors resulted from repair consistent with single-strand annealing followed by gap repair. Overexpression of Rad51, a protein central to DNA strand exchange and recombination, did not further increase the frequency of recovered translocations but did increase the frequency of long-tract gene conversion events associated with loss of heterozygosity and tandem duplications. These data directly demonstrate that hematopoietic multipotent progenitor cells are particularly susceptible to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements analogous to those observed in human hematopoietic malignancies. This particular subpopulation apparently represents a window of opportunity for the initiation of potentially oncogenic events following DNA damage.

Cancer Stem Cells in Hematopoietic Malignancies

Jones, Richard J.; Armstrong, Scott A.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /01/2008 Português
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Most hematopoietic malignancies are comprised of cells that are functionally heterogeneous with only a subset being responsible for tumor maintenance. These cancer stem cells are so named because they possess qualities reminiscent of normal tissue stem cells including self-renewal, prolonged survival, and the ability to give rise to cells with more differentiated characteristics. Effort is now focused on identifying cancer stem cells in various hematopoietic malignancies, and defining the cells of origin such that the stepwise accumulation of genetic/epigenetic events necessary for cancer stem cell development can be delineated. A detailed understanding of these processes could lead to development of therapeutics that more effectively treat hematopoietic malignancies and potentially other cancers.

Hematopoietic malignancies associated with viral and alcoholic hepatitis

Anderson, Lesley A; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Warren, Joan L; Landgren, Ola; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Berndt, Sonja I; Ricker, Winnie; Parsons, Ruth; Wheeler, William; Engels, Eric A
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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46.59%
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been associated with hematopoietic malignancies, but data for many subtypes are limited. From the U.S. SEER-Medicare database, we selected 61,464 cases (≥67 years) with hematopoietic malignancies and 122,531 population-based controls, frequency-matched by gender, age and year (1993–2002). Logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence of HCV, HBV and alcoholic hepatitis in cases and controls, adjusted for matching factors, race, duration of Medicare coverage, and number of physician claims. HCV, HBV, and alcoholic hepatitis were reported in 195 (0.3%), 111 (0.2%) and 404 (0.7%) cases and 264 (0.2%), 242 (0.2%) and 798 (0.7%) controls, respectively. HCV was associated with increased risk of diffuse large B-cell (OR 1.52, 95%CI 1.05–2.18), Burkitt (OR 5.21, 95%CI 1.62–16.8), follicular (OR 1.88, 95%CI 1.17–3.02), and marginal zone lymphomas (OR 2.20, 95%CI 1.22–3.95), and acute myeloid leukemia (OR 1.54, 95%CI 1.00–2.37). In contrast, HBV was unrelated to any hematopoietic malignancies. Alcoholic hepatitis was associated with decreased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but increased risk of Burkitt lymphoma. In summary, HCV, but not other causes of hepatitis, was associated with elevated risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia. HCV may induce lymphoproliferative malignancies through chronic immune stimulation.

Decreased IRF8 Expression in Aging Hematopoietic Progenitor/Stem Cells

Stirewalt, Derek L.; Choi, Yongjae Edward; Sharpless, Norman E.; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Cronk, Michelle R.; Yukawa, Michi; Larson, Eric B.; Wood, Brent L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Radich, Jerald P.; Heimfeld, Shelly
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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36.47%
To determine how aging impacts gene expression in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), human CD34+ cells from bone marrow (BMCD34+) and mobilized stem cell products (PBCD34+38-) were examined using microarray-based expression profiling. The age-associated expression changes in CD34+ cells were then compared to age-associated expression changes in murine HSCs. Interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) was the only gene with age-associated expression changes in all analyses, decreasing its expression in human CD34+ cells and murine HSCs. Microarray-based expression profiling found that IRF8 expression also decreased with aging in human T-cells, suggesting that the effects of aging on IRF8 expression may extend to more differentiated populations of hematopoietic cells. Quantitative-RT/PCR studies confirmed that IRF8 mRNA expression decreased with aging in additional samples of BMCD34+, PBCD34+38-, and T-cells, and IRF8 protein expression was found to decrease with aging and to correlate with mRNA levels in PBCD34+ cells. The results suggest that IRF8 may be a novel biomarker of aging for hematopoietic cells. Given that inactivation of IRF8 causes CML-like syndromes in mice and decreased IRF8 expression occurs in human hematopoietic malignancies...

Short Stat5-Interacting Peptide Derived from Phospholipase C-β3 Inhibits Hematopoietic Cell Proliferation and Myeloid Differentiation

Yasudo, Hiroki; Ando, Tomoaki; Xiao, Wenbin; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 20/09/2011 Português
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Constitutive activation of the transcription factor Stat5 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells leads to various hematopoietic malignancies including myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Our recent study found that phospholipase C (PLC)-β3 is a novel tumor suppressor involved in MPN, lymphoma and other tumors. Stat5 activity is negatively regulated by the SH2 domain-containing protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a PLC-β3-dependent manner. PLC-β3 can form the multimolecular SPS complex together with SHP-1 and Stat5. The close physical proximity of SHP-1 and Stat5 brought about by interacting with the C-terminal segment of PLC-β3 (PLC-β3-CT) accelerates SHP-1-mediated dephosphorylation of Stat5. Here we identify the minimal sequences within PLC-β3-CT required for its tumor suppressor function. Two of the three Stat5-binding noncontiguous regions, one of which also binds SHP-1, substantially inhibited in vitro proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Surprisingly, an 11-residue Stat5-binding peptide (residues 988-998) suppressed Stat5 activity in Ba/F3 cells and in vivo proliferation and myeloid differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, this study further defines PLC-β3-CT as the Stat5- and SHP-1-binding domain by identifying minimal functional sequences of PLC-β3 for its tumor suppressor function and implies their potential utility in the control of hematopoietic malignancies.

NUP98 gene fusions and hematopoietic malignancies: common themes and new biologic insights

Gough, Sheryl M.; Slape, Christopher I.; Aplan, Peter D.
Fonte: American Society of Hematology Publicador: American Society of Hematology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 08/12/2011 Português
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Structural chromosomal rearrangements of the Nucleoporin 98 gene (NUP98), primarily balanced translocations and inversions, are associated with a wide array of hematopoietic malignancies. NUP98 is known to be fused to at least 28 different partner genes in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and bilineage/biphenotypic leukemia. NUP98 gene fusions typically encode a fusion protein that retains the amino terminus of NUP98; in this context, it is important to note that several recent studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal portion of NUP98 exhibits transcription activation potential. Approximately half of the NUP98 fusion partners encode homeodomain proteins, and at least 5 NUP98 fusions involve known histone-modifying genes. Several of the NUP98 fusions, including NUP98-homeobox (HOX)A9, NUP98-HOXD13, and NUP98-JARID1A, have been used to generate animal models of both lymphoid and myeloid malignancy; these models typically up-regulate HOXA cluster genes, including HOXA5, HOXA7, HOXA9, and HOXA10. In addition, several of the NUP98 fusion proteins have been shown to inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic precursors and to increase self-renewal of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells...

Differential Requirements for c-Myc in Chronic Hematopoietic Hyperplasia and Acute Hematopoietic Malignancies in Pten-null Mice

Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Yechen; Guo, Yinshi; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Shubin; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Jiwang
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), acute T-lymphocytic or myeloid leukemia and T-lymphocytic lymphoma were developed in inducible Pten-knockout (Pten−/−) mice. The appearance of these multiple diseases in one animal model provides an opportunity to study the pathogenesis of multiple diseases simultaneously. To study whether Myc function is required for the development of these hematopoietic disorders in Pten−/− mice, we generated inducible Pten/Myc double-knockout mice (Pten−/−/Myc−/−). By comparing the hematopoietic phenotypes of these double-knockout mice with those of Pten−/− mice, we found that both sets of animals developed MPDs and LPDs. However, none of the compound-mutant mice developed acute leukemia or lymphoma. Interestingly, in contrast to the MPDs which developed in Pten−/− mice which are dominated by granulocytes, megakaryocytes predominate in the MPDs of Pten−/−/Myc−/− mice. Our study suggests that the deregulation of PI3K/Akt signaling in Pten−/− hematopoietic cells protects these cells from apoptotic cell death, resulting in chronic proliferative disorders. But due to the differential requirement for Myc in granulocyte as compared to megakaryocyte proliferation...

Sphingolipid Signaling and Hematopoietic Malignancies: To the Rheostat and Beyond

Loh, Kenneth C.; Baldwin, Dianna; Saba, Julie D.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/11/2011 Português
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Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid with diverse functions including the promotion of cell survival, proliferation, and migration, as well as the regulation of angiogenesis, inflammation, immunity, vascular permeability and nuclear mechanisms that control gene transcription. S1P is derived from metabolism of ceramide, which itself has diverse and generally growth-inhibitory effects through its impact on downstream targets involved in regulation of apoptosis, senescence and cell cycle progression. Regulation of ceramide, S1P and the biochemical steps that modulate the balance and interconversion of these two lipids are major determinants of cell fate, a concept referred to as the “sphingolipid rheostat.” There is abundant evidence that the sphingolipid rheostat plays a role in the origination, progression and drug resistance patterns of hematopoietic malignancies. The pathway has also been exploited to circumvent the problem of chemotherapy resistance in leukemia and lymphoma. Given the broad effects of sphingolipids, targeting multiple steps in the metabolic pathway may provide possible therapeutic avenues. However, new observations have revealed that sphingolipid signaling effects are more complex than previously recognized...

Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies

Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie
Fonte: Frontiers Media S.A. Publicador: Frontiers Media S.A.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 24/12/2012 Português
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46.35%
Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies.

The oncogenic microRNA miR-22 targets the TET2 tumor suppressor to promote hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and transformation

Song, Su Jung; Ito, Keisuke; Ala, Ugo; Kats, Lev; Webster, Kaitlyn; Sun, Suming; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Avigan, David E.; Delwel, Ruud; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 03/07/2013 Português
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36.44%
MicroRNAs are frequently deregulated in cancer. Here we show that miR-22 is upregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia, and its aberrant expression correlates with poor survival. To explore its role in hematopoietic stem cell function and malignancy, we generated transgenic mice conditionally expressing miR-22 in the hematopoietic compartment. These mice displayed reduced levels of global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) and increased hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, accompanied by defective differentiation. Conversely, miR-22 inhibition blocked proliferation in both mouse and human leukemic cells. Over time, miR-22 transgenic mice developed MDS and hematological malignancies. We also identify TET2 as a key target of miR-22 in this context. Ectopic expression of TET2 suppressed the miR-22-incuced phenotypes. Downregulation of TET2 protein also correlated with poor clinical outcomes and miR-22 overexpression in MDS patients. Our results therefore identify miR-22 as a potent proto-oncogene, and suggest that aberrations in the miR-22-TET2 regulatory network are common in hematopoietic malignancies.

Breaking and entering into the CNS: clues from solid tumor and nonmalignant models with relevance to hematopoietic malignancies

Basu, Soumit K.; Remick, Scot C.; Monga, Manish; Gibson, Laura F.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
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Various malignancies invade the CNS sanctuary site, accounting for the vast majority of CNS neoplastic foci and contributing to significant morbidity as well as mortality. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) exhibits considerable impermeability to chemotherapeutic agents, severely limiting therapeutic options available for patients developing metastatic CNS involvement, accounting for poor outcomes. The mechanisms by which malignant cells breach the highly exclusive BBB and subsequently survive in this unique anatomical site remain poorly understood, with most of the current knowledge stemming from non-malignant and solid malignancy models. While solid and hematologic malignancies may face different challenges once within the CNS (e.g., solid tumor parenchymal metastasis compared to masses/nodules/leptomeningeal disease in hematologic malignancies), commonality exists in the process of migrating across the BBB from the circulation. Specifically considering this last point, this review aims to survey the current mechanistic knowledge regarding malignant migration across the BBB, necessarily emphasizing the better studied solid tumor and nonmalignant models with the intention of highlighting both the current knowledge gap and additional work required to effectively consider how hematopoietic malignancies breach the CNS.

Spliceosome mutations in hematopoietic malignancies

Hahn, C.; Scott, H.
Fonte: Nature Publishing Group Publicador: Nature Publishing Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 Português
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46.26%
Recent studies, including two in this issue, report heterozygous missense mutations in the U2AF1 and SF3B1 genes that encode spliceosome subunits. U2AF1 is frequently mutated in myeloid hematopoietic malignancies, especially in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and SF3B1 is frequently mutated in both MDS and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).; Christopher N Hahn & Hamish S Scott

Matrix metalloproteinases in bone marrow: roles of gelatinases in physiological hematopoiesis and hematopoietic malignancies

Yu, X.F.; Han, Z.C.
Fonte: Murcia : F. Hernández Publicador: Murcia : F. Hernández
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: application/pdf
Português
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Turnover balance of extracellular matrix (ECM) is a prerequisite for the structural and functional homeostasis of bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. The role of ECM in physiologic hematopoiesis and its pathologic change in hematopoietic malignancies are very important and under extensive investigation. Accumulating evidence suggests that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of zinc-dependent proteinases, take an active part in the physiological and pathological hematopoiesis through remodeling the ECM in BM hematopoietic microenvironment. In this review, we will focus on the roles of MMPs in physiological hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cells mobilization/transplantation, and hematological malignancies. Furthermore, the preclinical studies on the role of synthetic MMP inhibitors in the treatment of hematological malignancies will be discussed.

Splice factor mutations and alternative splicing as drivers of hematopoietic malignancy

Hahn, C.N.; Venugopal, P.; Scott, H.; Hiwase, D.K.
Fonte: Wiley Publicador: Wiley
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2015 Português
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Differential splicing contributes to the vast complexity of mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms that are necessary for cellular homeostasis and response to developmental cues and external signals. The hematopoietic system provides an exquisite example of this. Recently, discovery of mutations in components of the spliceosome in various hematopoietic malignancies (HMs) has led to an explosion in knowledge of the role of splicing and splice factors in HMs and other cancers. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which alternative splicing and aberrant splicing contributes to the leukemogenic process will enable more efficacious targeted approaches to tackle these often difficult to treat diseases. The clinical implications are only just starting to be realized with novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies open to exploitation for patient benefit.; Christopher N. Hahn, Parvathy Venugopal, Hamish S. Scott, Devendra K. Hiwase; Article first published online: 15 DEC 2014

Structure and expression of the oncogene c-myc in fresh tumor material from patients with hematopoietic malignancies.

Rothberg, P G; Erisman, M D; Diehl, R E; Rovigatti, U G; Astrin, S M
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/1984 Português
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c-myc is the cellular gene homologous to the transforming sequence of MC29, an acute avian retrovirus. The human c-myc gene was cloned and used to study the structure and expression of c-myc in a variety of human hematopoietic malignancies. In a careful study of 106 patients, c-myc RNA was found to be expressed at elevated levels in tumor cells of 17 leukemia patients and five lymphoma patients. The c-myc gene was found to be rearranged in two lymphomas, an African Burkitt's lymphoma and a non-Hodgkins lymphoma in leukemic phase. The Burkitt's rearrangement involved the insertion of new DNA sequences upstream from the c-myc 5' coding region, presumably replacing the normal c-myc transcriptional promoter. None of the other 104 patients, including 20 with elevated myc expression, exhibited any evidence of a genetic rearrangement involving the c-myc gene. Our results show that there is a subset of hematopoietic malignancies characterized by elevated expression of c-myc. This elevated expression in most cases is not due to obvious genetic changes (rearrangement, amplification) at the c-myc locus nor to chromosomal translocations in the vicinity of this gene.

The Chromatin Regulator CHD8 Is a Context-Dependent Mediator of Cell Survival in Murine Hematopoietic Malignancies

Shingleton, Jennifer R.; Hemann, Michael T.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 20/11/2015 Português
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Aberrant chromatin regulation is a frequent driver of leukemogenesis. Mutations in chromatin regulators often result in more stem-like cells that seed a bulk leukemic population. Inhibitors targeting these proteins represent an emerging class of therapeutics, and identifying further chromatin regulators that promote disease progression may result in additional drug targets. We identified the chromatin-modifying protein CHD8 as necessary for cell survival in a mouse model of BCR-Abl+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This disease has a poor prognosis despite treatment with kinase inhibitors targeting BCR-Abl. Although implicated as a risk factor in autism spectrum disorder and a tumor suppressor in prostate and lung cancer, the mechanism of CHD8’s activity is still unclear and has never been studied in the context of hematopoietic malignancies. Here we demonstrate that depletion of CHD8 in B-ALL cells leads to cell death. While multiple B cell malignancies were dependent on CHD8 expression for survival, T cell malignancies displayed milder phenotypes upon CHD8 knockdown. In addition, ectopic expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain in a T cell malignancy partially alleviated the detrimental effect of CHD8 depletion. Our results demonstrate that CHD8 has a context-dependent role in cell survival...